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This Brewery Offers Paid ‘Pawternity’ Leave to New Dog Owners

This Brewery Offers Paid ‘Pawternity’ Leave to New Dog Owners

Brew Dog, a Scottish Pub, is opening a location in Columbus, Ohio, and bringing its unusual paid leave policy with it

Not such a “ruff” gig, is it?

Have you ever gotten a new canine friend but were dismayed that you had to face your new pal’s sad puppy dog eyes come Monday morning? If you work at this brewery, that won’t be a problem. Brew Dog, a Scottish Pub with an apropos name, has a “pawternity leave” policy for new dog owners, which allows all 1,000 employees who adopt or buy a pup to take a week off to bond with their new furry friend. It’s the first brewery in the UK to offer such a policy.

Brew Dog will soon be opening a new location in Columbus, Ohio — their first US location — and the pet-friendly policy will be hopping the pond with them. Dogs are also allowed to accompany their pet parents to any one of the 44 Brew Dog locations across the UK.

“One of our aims as a business is to be the best company to work for. Ever. Puppy Parental Leave is just one small step towards making that a reality, as we launched it as a direct response to staff members who were taking holiday days to settle in new dogs, or worrying about their new best friend at home when they were at work,” owner James Watt told Vice’s Munchies. “The two things we care most about in the world are beer and people. We also really, really like dogs.”

Brew Dog also offers “an enhanced maternity and paternity leave and pay policy,” but unfortunately the same policy does not apply to cats, hamsters, goldfish, etc. Sorry, Fluffy.


'Pawternity' leave - firms with unusual staff benefits

Gia, who lives in Columbus, Ohio, is the proud owner of a nine-week-old goldendoodle puppy (a cross between a golden retriever and a poodle) called Rye.

Like any young dog it is going to require a fair amount of training to ensure it becomes housetrained and obedient.

But what can you do if, like Gia, you work full-time, and you don't have any holiday time left to dedicate to your new four-legged friend?

Thankfully for Gia, her employer - Scottish brewer Brewdog - announced a rather unusual new employee perk earlier this year - one week's paid leave for all workers who adopt a puppy or rescue dog.

Unsurprisingly the announcement - which was released to the media in a press release rather than just told to staff - made headlines around the world. Newspaper reports were quick to praise the scheme that Brewdog has dubbed "pawternity" leave.

However, the more cynical may have wondered whether there was more than a whiff of gimmick to Brewdog's unusual new employee benefit. They may further question whether it was unveiled as "clickbait" to draw attention to a press release that also announced that the company had just opened a new 100,000 sq ft (9,000sq m) North American brewery in Columbus.

Not that Gia, who works at the new facility, has any complaints. "The policy gives me the flexibility to choose when to take a fully paid week off with Rye, which I'll be doing next month to get her fully house trained," she says.

And in defence of Brewdog, it has also always been dog-friendly, and allows employees to take their pets to work with them.

While employee perks are nothing new, they have become both more unusual and headline grabbing in recent years. But why exactly are firms offering them?


'Pawternity' leave - firms with unusual staff benefits

Gia, who lives in Columbus, Ohio, is the proud owner of a nine-week-old goldendoodle puppy (a cross between a golden retriever and a poodle) called Rye.

Like any young dog it is going to require a fair amount of training to ensure it becomes housetrained and obedient.

But what can you do if, like Gia, you work full-time, and you don't have any holiday time left to dedicate to your new four-legged friend?

Thankfully for Gia, her employer - Scottish brewer Brewdog - announced a rather unusual new employee perk earlier this year - one week's paid leave for all workers who adopt a puppy or rescue dog.

Unsurprisingly the announcement - which was released to the media in a press release rather than just told to staff - made headlines around the world. Newspaper reports were quick to praise the scheme that Brewdog has dubbed "pawternity" leave.

However, the more cynical may have wondered whether there was more than a whiff of gimmick to Brewdog's unusual new employee benefit. They may further question whether it was unveiled as "clickbait" to draw attention to a press release that also announced that the company had just opened a new 100,000 sq ft (9,000sq m) North American brewery in Columbus.

Not that Gia, who works at the new facility, has any complaints. "The policy gives me the flexibility to choose when to take a fully paid week off with Rye, which I'll be doing next month to get her fully house trained," she says.

And in defence of Brewdog, it has also always been dog-friendly, and allows employees to take their pets to work with them.

While employee perks are nothing new, they have become both more unusual and headline grabbing in recent years. But why exactly are firms offering them?


'Pawternity' leave - firms with unusual staff benefits

Gia, who lives in Columbus, Ohio, is the proud owner of a nine-week-old goldendoodle puppy (a cross between a golden retriever and a poodle) called Rye.

Like any young dog it is going to require a fair amount of training to ensure it becomes housetrained and obedient.

But what can you do if, like Gia, you work full-time, and you don't have any holiday time left to dedicate to your new four-legged friend?

Thankfully for Gia, her employer - Scottish brewer Brewdog - announced a rather unusual new employee perk earlier this year - one week's paid leave for all workers who adopt a puppy or rescue dog.

Unsurprisingly the announcement - which was released to the media in a press release rather than just told to staff - made headlines around the world. Newspaper reports were quick to praise the scheme that Brewdog has dubbed "pawternity" leave.

However, the more cynical may have wondered whether there was more than a whiff of gimmick to Brewdog's unusual new employee benefit. They may further question whether it was unveiled as "clickbait" to draw attention to a press release that also announced that the company had just opened a new 100,000 sq ft (9,000sq m) North American brewery in Columbus.

Not that Gia, who works at the new facility, has any complaints. "The policy gives me the flexibility to choose when to take a fully paid week off with Rye, which I'll be doing next month to get her fully house trained," she says.

And in defence of Brewdog, it has also always been dog-friendly, and allows employees to take their pets to work with them.

While employee perks are nothing new, they have become both more unusual and headline grabbing in recent years. But why exactly are firms offering them?


'Pawternity' leave - firms with unusual staff benefits

Gia, who lives in Columbus, Ohio, is the proud owner of a nine-week-old goldendoodle puppy (a cross between a golden retriever and a poodle) called Rye.

Like any young dog it is going to require a fair amount of training to ensure it becomes housetrained and obedient.

But what can you do if, like Gia, you work full-time, and you don't have any holiday time left to dedicate to your new four-legged friend?

Thankfully for Gia, her employer - Scottish brewer Brewdog - announced a rather unusual new employee perk earlier this year - one week's paid leave for all workers who adopt a puppy or rescue dog.

Unsurprisingly the announcement - which was released to the media in a press release rather than just told to staff - made headlines around the world. Newspaper reports were quick to praise the scheme that Brewdog has dubbed "pawternity" leave.

However, the more cynical may have wondered whether there was more than a whiff of gimmick to Brewdog's unusual new employee benefit. They may further question whether it was unveiled as "clickbait" to draw attention to a press release that also announced that the company had just opened a new 100,000 sq ft (9,000sq m) North American brewery in Columbus.

Not that Gia, who works at the new facility, has any complaints. "The policy gives me the flexibility to choose when to take a fully paid week off with Rye, which I'll be doing next month to get her fully house trained," she says.

And in defence of Brewdog, it has also always been dog-friendly, and allows employees to take their pets to work with them.

While employee perks are nothing new, they have become both more unusual and headline grabbing in recent years. But why exactly are firms offering them?


'Pawternity' leave - firms with unusual staff benefits

Gia, who lives in Columbus, Ohio, is the proud owner of a nine-week-old goldendoodle puppy (a cross between a golden retriever and a poodle) called Rye.

Like any young dog it is going to require a fair amount of training to ensure it becomes housetrained and obedient.

But what can you do if, like Gia, you work full-time, and you don't have any holiday time left to dedicate to your new four-legged friend?

Thankfully for Gia, her employer - Scottish brewer Brewdog - announced a rather unusual new employee perk earlier this year - one week's paid leave for all workers who adopt a puppy or rescue dog.

Unsurprisingly the announcement - which was released to the media in a press release rather than just told to staff - made headlines around the world. Newspaper reports were quick to praise the scheme that Brewdog has dubbed "pawternity" leave.

However, the more cynical may have wondered whether there was more than a whiff of gimmick to Brewdog's unusual new employee benefit. They may further question whether it was unveiled as "clickbait" to draw attention to a press release that also announced that the company had just opened a new 100,000 sq ft (9,000sq m) North American brewery in Columbus.

Not that Gia, who works at the new facility, has any complaints. "The policy gives me the flexibility to choose when to take a fully paid week off with Rye, which I'll be doing next month to get her fully house trained," she says.

And in defence of Brewdog, it has also always been dog-friendly, and allows employees to take their pets to work with them.

While employee perks are nothing new, they have become both more unusual and headline grabbing in recent years. But why exactly are firms offering them?


'Pawternity' leave - firms with unusual staff benefits

Gia, who lives in Columbus, Ohio, is the proud owner of a nine-week-old goldendoodle puppy (a cross between a golden retriever and a poodle) called Rye.

Like any young dog it is going to require a fair amount of training to ensure it becomes housetrained and obedient.

But what can you do if, like Gia, you work full-time, and you don't have any holiday time left to dedicate to your new four-legged friend?

Thankfully for Gia, her employer - Scottish brewer Brewdog - announced a rather unusual new employee perk earlier this year - one week's paid leave for all workers who adopt a puppy or rescue dog.

Unsurprisingly the announcement - which was released to the media in a press release rather than just told to staff - made headlines around the world. Newspaper reports were quick to praise the scheme that Brewdog has dubbed "pawternity" leave.

However, the more cynical may have wondered whether there was more than a whiff of gimmick to Brewdog's unusual new employee benefit. They may further question whether it was unveiled as "clickbait" to draw attention to a press release that also announced that the company had just opened a new 100,000 sq ft (9,000sq m) North American brewery in Columbus.

Not that Gia, who works at the new facility, has any complaints. "The policy gives me the flexibility to choose when to take a fully paid week off with Rye, which I'll be doing next month to get her fully house trained," she says.

And in defence of Brewdog, it has also always been dog-friendly, and allows employees to take their pets to work with them.

While employee perks are nothing new, they have become both more unusual and headline grabbing in recent years. But why exactly are firms offering them?


'Pawternity' leave - firms with unusual staff benefits

Gia, who lives in Columbus, Ohio, is the proud owner of a nine-week-old goldendoodle puppy (a cross between a golden retriever and a poodle) called Rye.

Like any young dog it is going to require a fair amount of training to ensure it becomes housetrained and obedient.

But what can you do if, like Gia, you work full-time, and you don't have any holiday time left to dedicate to your new four-legged friend?

Thankfully for Gia, her employer - Scottish brewer Brewdog - announced a rather unusual new employee perk earlier this year - one week's paid leave for all workers who adopt a puppy or rescue dog.

Unsurprisingly the announcement - which was released to the media in a press release rather than just told to staff - made headlines around the world. Newspaper reports were quick to praise the scheme that Brewdog has dubbed "pawternity" leave.

However, the more cynical may have wondered whether there was more than a whiff of gimmick to Brewdog's unusual new employee benefit. They may further question whether it was unveiled as "clickbait" to draw attention to a press release that also announced that the company had just opened a new 100,000 sq ft (9,000sq m) North American brewery in Columbus.

Not that Gia, who works at the new facility, has any complaints. "The policy gives me the flexibility to choose when to take a fully paid week off with Rye, which I'll be doing next month to get her fully house trained," she says.

And in defence of Brewdog, it has also always been dog-friendly, and allows employees to take their pets to work with them.

While employee perks are nothing new, they have become both more unusual and headline grabbing in recent years. But why exactly are firms offering them?


'Pawternity' leave - firms with unusual staff benefits

Gia, who lives in Columbus, Ohio, is the proud owner of a nine-week-old goldendoodle puppy (a cross between a golden retriever and a poodle) called Rye.

Like any young dog it is going to require a fair amount of training to ensure it becomes housetrained and obedient.

But what can you do if, like Gia, you work full-time, and you don't have any holiday time left to dedicate to your new four-legged friend?

Thankfully for Gia, her employer - Scottish brewer Brewdog - announced a rather unusual new employee perk earlier this year - one week's paid leave for all workers who adopt a puppy or rescue dog.

Unsurprisingly the announcement - which was released to the media in a press release rather than just told to staff - made headlines around the world. Newspaper reports were quick to praise the scheme that Brewdog has dubbed "pawternity" leave.

However, the more cynical may have wondered whether there was more than a whiff of gimmick to Brewdog's unusual new employee benefit. They may further question whether it was unveiled as "clickbait" to draw attention to a press release that also announced that the company had just opened a new 100,000 sq ft (9,000sq m) North American brewery in Columbus.

Not that Gia, who works at the new facility, has any complaints. "The policy gives me the flexibility to choose when to take a fully paid week off with Rye, which I'll be doing next month to get her fully house trained," she says.

And in defence of Brewdog, it has also always been dog-friendly, and allows employees to take their pets to work with them.

While employee perks are nothing new, they have become both more unusual and headline grabbing in recent years. But why exactly are firms offering them?


'Pawternity' leave - firms with unusual staff benefits

Gia, who lives in Columbus, Ohio, is the proud owner of a nine-week-old goldendoodle puppy (a cross between a golden retriever and a poodle) called Rye.

Like any young dog it is going to require a fair amount of training to ensure it becomes housetrained and obedient.

But what can you do if, like Gia, you work full-time, and you don't have any holiday time left to dedicate to your new four-legged friend?

Thankfully for Gia, her employer - Scottish brewer Brewdog - announced a rather unusual new employee perk earlier this year - one week's paid leave for all workers who adopt a puppy or rescue dog.

Unsurprisingly the announcement - which was released to the media in a press release rather than just told to staff - made headlines around the world. Newspaper reports were quick to praise the scheme that Brewdog has dubbed "pawternity" leave.

However, the more cynical may have wondered whether there was more than a whiff of gimmick to Brewdog's unusual new employee benefit. They may further question whether it was unveiled as "clickbait" to draw attention to a press release that also announced that the company had just opened a new 100,000 sq ft (9,000sq m) North American brewery in Columbus.

Not that Gia, who works at the new facility, has any complaints. "The policy gives me the flexibility to choose when to take a fully paid week off with Rye, which I'll be doing next month to get her fully house trained," she says.

And in defence of Brewdog, it has also always been dog-friendly, and allows employees to take their pets to work with them.

While employee perks are nothing new, they have become both more unusual and headline grabbing in recent years. But why exactly are firms offering them?


'Pawternity' leave - firms with unusual staff benefits

Gia, who lives in Columbus, Ohio, is the proud owner of a nine-week-old goldendoodle puppy (a cross between a golden retriever and a poodle) called Rye.

Like any young dog it is going to require a fair amount of training to ensure it becomes housetrained and obedient.

But what can you do if, like Gia, you work full-time, and you don't have any holiday time left to dedicate to your new four-legged friend?

Thankfully for Gia, her employer - Scottish brewer Brewdog - announced a rather unusual new employee perk earlier this year - one week's paid leave for all workers who adopt a puppy or rescue dog.

Unsurprisingly the announcement - which was released to the media in a press release rather than just told to staff - made headlines around the world. Newspaper reports were quick to praise the scheme that Brewdog has dubbed "pawternity" leave.

However, the more cynical may have wondered whether there was more than a whiff of gimmick to Brewdog's unusual new employee benefit. They may further question whether it was unveiled as "clickbait" to draw attention to a press release that also announced that the company had just opened a new 100,000 sq ft (9,000sq m) North American brewery in Columbus.

Not that Gia, who works at the new facility, has any complaints. "The policy gives me the flexibility to choose when to take a fully paid week off with Rye, which I'll be doing next month to get her fully house trained," she says.

And in defence of Brewdog, it has also always been dog-friendly, and allows employees to take their pets to work with them.

While employee perks are nothing new, they have become both more unusual and headline grabbing in recent years. But why exactly are firms offering them?


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