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Mahogany Beef Stew with Red Wine and Hoisin Sauce

Mahogany Beef Stew with Red Wine and Hoisin Sauce

Ingredients

  • 3 1/2 pounds boneless beef chuck roast, trimmed, cut into 2 1/2-inch pieces
  • 3 1/2 cups chopped onions
  • 2 cups Cabernet Sauvignon
  • 1 14.5-ounce can diced tomatoes with Italian herbs, undrained
  • 1/2 cup hoisin sauce (available at Asian markets and in the Asian foods section of some supermarkets)
  • 1 pound slender carrots, peeled, cut diagonally into 1-inch lengths
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch mixed with 1 tablespoon water
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

Recipe Preparation

  • Heat 2 tablespoons oil in heavy large pot over high heat. Sprinkle meat with salt and pepper. Add meat to pot; sauté until brown on all sides, about 10 minutes. Push meat to sides of pot. Reduce heat to medium; add 2 tablespoons oil to pot. Add onions; sauté until golden brown, about 15 minutes. Mix meat into onions. Add 1 cup wine, tomatoes with juices, hoisin sauce, and bay leaves. Bring to boil.

  • Reduce heat to low, cover pot and simmer 45 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add carrots and 1 cup wine. Cover; simmer 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Uncover, increase heat to high; boil until sauce is slightly thickened, stirring occasionally, about 15 minutes longer. Reduce heat to medium, add cornstarch mixture and simmer until sauce thickens, stirring occasionally, about 8 minutes. Discard bay leaves. Season stew with salt and pepper. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Cool slightly. Chill uncovered until cold, then cover and keep refrigerated. Bring to simmer before serving, stirring occasionally.) Transfer stew to large bowl. Sprinkle with parsley; serve.

,Photos by Pornchai MittongtareReviews Section

Mahogany Beef Stew

I field tested this at home. It's way too complicated for camp (except, for maybe Piper San and his musical Dutch oven?) but is EXCELLENT at home. I had three bowls of it for lunch yesterday, and never could figure out what was wrong with it. :wink: JARVIS good eatin'!

Ingredients:
Group# 1:
4 Tbsp olive oil
3 ½ lbs boneless beef chuck roast, trimmed, cut into 1/2 inch pieces
4 cups chopped onions (2ea large, or 3ea medium)
Group# 2:
2 cups good-quality red wine , separated
1 (14 ½ ounce) can diced tomatoes, WITH liquid
½ tsp dried oregano
½ tsp dried basil
¼ tsp thyme
½ cup hoisin sauce (this is a critical ingredient, don't leave it out!)
2 bay leaves
1-5 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 lb slender carrots, peeled, cut diagonally into 1 inch lengths
5 stalks celery, diced
Group# 3:
1 Tbsp cornstarch & 1 Tbsp water – mixed
2 Tbsp chopped fresh parsley
Stuff to do:
Heat 2 Tbsp olive oil in a large, heavy pot over high heat. Add meat to pot sauté until brown on all sides, about 15 minutes. Remove it to separate pan or plate, and sprinkle meat with salt and pepper.
Reduce heat to medium add 2 Tbsp oil to pot. Add onions sauté until golden brown, about 20 - 25 minutes. Mix meat into onions.
Add 1 cup wine and the rest of group# 2.
Bring to boil. Reduce heat to low, cover pot and simmer 45 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add second of cup wine, cover simmer 30 minutes - stirring occasionally.
Uncover, increase heat to high boil until sauce is slightly thickened, stirring occasionally, about 15 minutes longer. Reduce heat to medium, add parsley and cornstarch mixture, simmer until sauce thickens, stirring occasionally, about 8 minutes. Discard bay leaves.
Transfer stew to large bowl. Sprinkle with parsley and serve. Excellent with buttered egg noodles.


Mahogany beef stew with red wine and hoisin sauce

4 tbsp olive oil, divided 3-1/2 lbs boneless beef chuck roast, trimmed and cubed 3-1/2 cups onion, chopped 2 cups Cabernet Sauvignon, divided 14-1/2 pz canned diced tomatoes w/ Italian herbs 1/2 cup hoisin sauce 2 bay leaves 1 lb slder carrots, peeled and cut diagonally into 1" pieces 1 tbp cornstarch mixed w/ 1 tbsp water (slurry) 1. Heat half of the oil. Season meat and add to pot saute until browned on all sides (10 mins. Push meat to the sides of the pot and add remaining oil. Saute onions until golden brown mix meat into onions. Add 1 c. wine, tomatoes with juice, hoisin and bay leaves. Bring to a boil, cover and simmer 45 mins. Add carrots and remaining wine. Cover and simmer 30 mins. 2. Uncover and bring to a boil and simmer until sauce thickens (15 mins). Add slurry and cook until thickened. Discard bay leaves and season.

*Can be prepared 1 day ahead cool slightly and refrigerate uncovered until cold, then cover and keep refrigerated.


Mahogany Beef Stew with Red Wine and Hoisin Sauce

Hoisin adds complexity to the flavor of the sauce. You can save some time — and some tears — by chopping the onions in the processor in two batches.

Ingredients

  • 4 tbsp olive oil
  • 3½ lbs boneless beef chuck roast (trimmed, cut into 2½-inch pieces)
  • 3½ cups onion (chopped)
  • 2 cups Cabernet Sauvignon wine
  • 1 14.5oz can diced tomatoes with Italian herbs (undrained)
  • ½ cups Hoisin sauce
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 lbs slender carrots (peeled, cut diagonally into 1-inch lengths)
  • 1 tbsp cornstarch (mixed with 1 tbsp water)
  • 2 tbsp fresh parsley (chopped)

Instructions

  • Step 1 Heat 2 tablespoons oil in heavy large pot over high heat. Sprinkle meat with salt and pepper. Add meat to pot sauté until brown on all sides, about 10 minutes.
  • Step 2 Push meat to sides of pot. Reduce heat to medium add 2 tablespoons oil to pot. Add onions sauté until golden brown, about 15 minutes.
  • Step 3 Mix meat into onions. Add 1 cup wine, tomatoes with juices, hoisin sauce, and bay leaves. Bring to boil.
  • Step 4 Reduce heat to low, cover pot and simmer 45 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  • Step 5 Add carrots and 1 cup wine. Cover simmer 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  • Step 6 Uncover, increase heat to high boil until sauce is slightly thickened, stirring occasionally, about 15 minutes longer.
  • Step 7 Reduce heat to medium, add cornstarch mixture and simmer until sauce thickens, stirring occasionally, about 8 minutes.
  • Step 8 Discard bay leaves. Season stew with salt and pepper.
  • Step 9 Transfer stew to large bowl. Sprinkle with parsley serve.

Notes

Can be made 1 day ahead: After seasoning stew with salt and pepper, cool slightly. Chill uncovered until cold, then cover and keep refrigerated. Bring to simmer before serving, stirring occasionally.


The Spinster Cooks


This is my favorite beef stew recipe. Since I first tried it, I rarely make the more traditional beef stew. When served over Horseradish Mashed Potatoes it makes for an excellent combination of sweet and spicy. Horseradish mashed potatoes by themselves are great. This beef stew is great. But paired together, you have something that reaches an entirely different level.

Here are the ingredients, or most of them. Ingredients: beef roast, wine, onions, diced tomatoes, hoisin sauce, carrots and herbs.

First, cut the meat into cubes. I used a tip roast because it was on sale. Once it is cut, brown it in a Dutch oven with 1 or 2 tablespoons of oil. At this point, you could put it in a crock pot. Or you can cook it on the stove top. I chose to cook it in the oven on a low temperature because I thought this roast, since it is a tri-tip with little fat, needed to be braised.

Next, add diced onion and herbs. The herbs include: rosemary, basil, oregano and bay leaves. I chopped the herbs, except for the bay leaf. You don't want to eat a bay leaf by mistake. I did that once. It was a very, very bad decision. The result was not something one should discuss in a cooking blog. Remember to take it out right before you serve.

If you are using tomatoes with Italian herbs, you don't need to add more herbs.

Then, add the hoisin, wine and tomatoes.

Add salt and pepper and mix it all together. Cover and put in a 250 degree oven for 2-3 hours. Or in your slow cooker on low or high, depending on how long you want it to cook. Or see the original recipe below to cook it on the stove top.

Cook until beef is tender. I did this batch for about 3 hours in a low oven. Add carrots.

This is the point when my photographer got all artsy and insisted that I not put all the carrots in the picture. Just know I used twice this many.

Cook until the carrots are almost tender. At this point, move it to the top of the stove on medium to high heat and remove the lid. You want to sauce to thicken up while the carrots continue to cook. If the liquid doesn't reduce and thicken by the time the potatoes are done, add a little corn starch slurry (cornstarch dissolved in a little water). Rarely have I had to add the slurry.

Horseradish Mashed Potatoes/Parsnips

If you make this stew, you are required by law to make these potatoes. There are two key ingredients in these potatoes that make them different than your average mashed potatoes. One is the horseradish. The other is a parsnip or turnip. In these mashed potatoes I usually use half potatoes and half parsnips or turnips.

Let me take this moment to laud the under appreciated parsnips and turnips. They are one of nature's miracles. They add a depth of flavor that is incredible. Put them in anything that requires a potato or carrot. I love them in mashed potatoes, chicken broth and stews. You only need one. For such a simple vegetable it has a big personality.

My grandmother used to serve parsnips fried in butter as a side dish. I loved them. I haven't had them in y
ears, but I'm sure they will be showing up on this blog one day soon.

Here are the ingredients for my mashed potatoes: potatoes, a parsnip, butter, milk and grated horseradish.

The moody artist once again insisted that I limit the number of potatoes in this picture. I actually used four, but heaven forbid all of them be used in a photo. He said something about balance and blah, blah, blah.

Cut the potatoes into cubes. I don't peel them because I'm lazy, but I tell everyone it's because of the nutrients in the skins. I do peel the parsnip. Most parsnips you will buy are dipped in wax to help preserve them. Peeling them takes the wax off. I also peel the ones that aren't dipped in wax. I don't know if you need to. I just do it out of habit.

Put potatoes and turnip in salted cold water and bring to a boil. Simmer until they are just tender when pierced with a fork. Don't cook them any longer. They will get watery. Drain the vegetables and put them back in the hot pan. Add butter - I eye ball it but it's usually 2 to 3 tablespoons. Drop in a tablespoon of horseradish and then milk. I eye ball that too. The more milk you add, the wetter the potatoes. I add little by little until I have the consistency I want. Since this stew will add moisture, I make them more on the dry side. Taste the potatoes and add horseradish as needed. I like them best when they sear the inside of my nose. You may want them a little less horseradishy depending on your preference.

Don't be afraid to make more than you need for dinner. They are wonderful in potato pancakes for breakfast the next morning.

Then plop them in a bowl and ladle the stew over the top. It will look something like this:

Mahogany Beef Stew with Red Wine and Hoisin Sauce
Bon Appétit | February 2002

  • 4 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 1/2 pounds boneless beef chuck roast, trimmed, cut into 2 1/2-inch pieces
  • 3 1/2 cups chopped onions
  • 2 cups Cabernet Sauvignon
  • 1 14.5-ounce can diced tomatoes with Italian herbs, undrained
  • 1/2 cup hoisin sauce*
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 pound slender carrots, peeled, cut diagonally into 1-inch lengths
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch mixed with 1 tablespoon water
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

Mashed Horseradish Potatoes with Parsnips or Turnips.


4 potatoes, cubed
2 small or 1 large Parsnip, sliced and cubed.
3 T. butter
1/4- 1/2 c. milk
1 or 2 T. of horseradish

Put potatoes and parsnip in cold salted water. Bring to a boil. Simmer until vegetables are just fork tender. Drain and return to hot pan. Add butter, milk and horseradish. Mash to desired consistency. Taste. Add more milk and horseradish to your preference. This is no time to be timid!


Step 1

Heat 2 tablespoons oil in heavy large pot over high heat. Sprinkle meat with salt and pepper. Add meat to pot sautntil brown on all sides, about 10 minutes. Push meat to sides of pot. Reduce heat to medium add 2 tablespoons oil to pot. Add onions sautntil golden brown, about 15 minutes. Mix meat into onions. Add 1 cup wine, tomatoes with juices, hoisin sauce, and bay leaves. Bring to boil.
Reduce heat to low, cover pot and simmer 45 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add carrots and 1 cup wine. Cover simmer 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Uncover, increase heat to high boil until sauce is slightly thickened, stirring occasionally, about 15 minutes longer. Reduce heat to medium, add cornstarch mixture and simmer until sauce thickens, stirring occasionally, about 8 minutes. Discard bay leaves. Season stew with salt and pepper. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Cool slightly. Chill uncovered until cold, then cover and keep refrigerated. Bring to simmer before serving, stirring occasionally.) Transfer stew to large bowl. Sprinkle with parsley serve.


A wonderful beef stew

I know this recipe is out of season but since I think it is so good, I’ve decided to post it anyway. The recipe is Mahogany Beef Stew with Red Wine and Hoisin (via Epicurious.com). I love the balance created by the large amount of onions in the recipe and the sweetness of the hoisin sauce. The red wine adds a nice complexity to the mix as does the hoisin. The carrots are wonderfully flavored by the stew and the cornstarch adds just the right amount of body to the stew while also giving a nod to the Asian influences in this dish. This is exactly the type of recipe I love-a simple recipe of a classic dish dressed up by what I like to call a “wow” ingredient. In this case, the wow is supplied by the hoisin sauce. Give this dish a try, especially over my mashed potatoes. Here’s the recipe:

Mahogany Beef Stew with Red Wine and Hoisin

4 tablespoons olive oil

3 1/2 pounds boneless beef chuck roast, trimmed, cut into 2 1/2-inch pieces

3 1/2 cups chopped onions

2 cups Cabernet Sauvignon

1 14.5-ounce can diced tomatoes with Italian herbs, undrained

1/2 cup hoisin sauce

2 bay leaves

1 pound slender carrots, peeled, cut diagonally into 1-inch lengths

1 tablespoon cornstarch mixed with 1 tablespoon water

2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

Heat 2 tablespoons oil in heavy large pot over high heat. Sprinkle meat with salt and pepper. Add meat to pot sauté until brown on all sides, about 10 minutes. Push meat to sides of pot. Reduce heat to medium add 2 tablespoons oil to pot. Add onions sauté until golden brown, about 15 minutes. Mix meat into onions. Add 1 cup wine, tomatoes with juices, hoisin sauce, and bay leaves. Bring to boil.

Reduce heat to low, cover pot and simmer 45 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add carrots and 1 cup wine. Cover simmer 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Uncover, increase heat to high boil until sauce is slightly thickened, stirring occasionally, about 15 minutes longer. Reduce heat to medium, add cornstarch mixture and simmer until sauce thickens, stirring occasionally, about 8 minutes. Discard bay leaves. Season stew with salt and pepper. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Cool slightly. Chill uncovered until cold, then cover and keep refrigerated. Bring to simmer before serving, stirring occasionally.) Transfer stew to large bowl. Sprinkle with parsley serve.

Makes 6 servings.

A few notes on the recipe. A enameled cast iron Dutch oven works wonders for this recipe. But whatever pot you use, make sure you get a good brown on all of the meat. This may take a lot of time. Be patient, however, as this will determine much of the final flavor in the dish. What happens during the browning is called the Maillard reaction. It is a complex, and not yet fully understood, process in which food browns (it is distinct from caramelization which only has to do with sugar). Apart from giving food a nice appearance, this reaction gives a lot of flavor to food. It is what will give that nice, deep flavor that everyone craves in a stew. Attendant to this direction, is the technique of frying the meat in batches if your pot (and I know it isn’t) does not have enough surface area to comfortably hold one layer of meat. You do not want to crowd the meat in the pan, else it will steam instead of brown and you will get none of that wonderful flavor. So, just heat the oil in the pan and put just enough meat in the pan to cover and let that side of the meat brown before turning. When that batch of meat has been browned on each side, take it out of the pan and hold it until the rest of the meat is done. When all the meat is done (and, in this recipe, the onions are cooked), add all the meat back into the pan along with any juices. Last thing, there is a funny little instruction in the recipe of cook the onions in the middle of the meat. I really see no reason for this. I would suggest to take all of the meat out of the pan and saute the onions on their own until they are cooked. It will be faster and far easier. Also be sure to be scraping the bottom of the pan with the onions you will actually be deglazing the pan with the liquid from the onions. Those little brown bits of meat, called frond, have a ton of flavor in them and you want to get all of that into your stew. Enjoy.


Saturday, October 9, 2010

Mahogany Beef Stew with Horseradish Mashed Potatoes

This is my favorite beef stew recipe. Since I first tried it, I rarely make the more traditional beef stew. When served over Horseradish Mashed Potatoes it makes for an excellent combination of sweet and spicy. Horseradish mashed potatoes by themselves are great. This beef stew is great. But paired together, you have something that reaches an entirely different level.

Here are the ingredients, or most of them. Ingredients: beef roast, wine, onions, diced tomatoes, hoisin sauce, carrots and herbs.

First, cut the meat into cubes. I used a tip roast because it was on sale. Once it is cut, brown it in a Dutch oven with 1 or 2 tablespoons of oil. At this point, you could put it in a crock pot. Or you can cook it on the stove top. I chose to cook it in the oven on a low temperature because I thought this roast, since it is a tri-tip with little fat, needed to be braised.

Next, add diced onion and herbs. The herbs include: rosemary, basil, oregano and bay leaves. I chopped the herbs, except for the bay leaf. You don't want to eat a bay leaf by mistake. I did that once. It was a very, very bad decision. The result was not something one should discuss in a cooking blog. Remember to take it out right before you serve.

If you are using tomatoes with Italian herbs, you don't need to add more herbs.

Then, add the hoisin, wine and tomatoes.

Add salt and pepper and mix it all together. Cover and put in a 250 degree oven for 2-3 hours. Or in your slow cooker on low or high, depending on how long you want it to cook. Or see the original recipe below to cook it on the stove top.

Cook until beef is tender. I did this batch for about 3 hours in a low oven. Add carrots.

This is the point when my photographer got all artsy and insisted that I not put all the carrots in the picture. Just know I used twice this many.

Cook until the carrots are almost tender. At this point, move it to the top of the stove on medium to high heat and remove the lid. You want to sauce to thicken up while the carrots continue to cook. If the liquid doesn't reduce and thicken by the time the potatoes are done, add a little corn starch slurry (cornstarch dissolved in a little water). Rarely have I had to add the slurry.

Horseradish Mashed Potatoes/Parsnips

If you make this stew, you are required by law to make these potatoes. There are two key ingredients in these potatoes that make them different than your average mashed potatoes. One is the horseradish. The other is a parsnip or turnip. In these mashed potatoes I usually use half potatoes and half parsnips or turnips.

Let me take this moment to laud the under appreciated parsnips and turnips. They are one of nature's miracles. They add a depth of flavor that is incredible. Put them in anything that requires a potato or carrot. I love them in mashed potatoes, chicken broth and stews. You only need one. For such a simple vegetable it has a big personality.

My grandmother used to serve parsnips fried in butter as a side dish. I loved them. I haven't had them in y
ears, but I'm sure they will be showing up on this blog one day soon.

Here are the ingredients for my mashed potatoes: potatoes, a parsnip, butter, milk and grated horseradish.

The moody artist once again insisted that I limit the number of potatoes in this picture. I actually used four, but heaven forbid all of them be used in a photo. He said something about balance and blah, blah, blah.

Cut the potatoes into cubes. I don't peel them because I'm lazy, but I tell everyone it's because of the nutrients in the skins. I do peel the parsnip. Most parsnips you will buy are dipped in wax to help preserve them. Peeling them takes the wax off. I also peel the ones that aren't dipped in wax. I don't know if you need to. I just do it out of habit.

Put potatoes and turnip in salted cold water and bring to a boil. Simmer until they are just tender when pierced with a fork. Don't cook them any longer. They will get watery. Drain the vegetables and put them back in the hot pan. Add butter - I eye ball it but it's usually 2 to 3 tablespoons. Drop in a tablespoon of horseradish and then milk. I eye ball that too. The more milk you add, the wetter the potatoes. I add little by little until I have the consistency I want. Since this stew will add moisture, I make them more on the dry side. Taste the potatoes and add horseradish as needed. I like them best when they sear the inside of my nose. You may want them a little less horseradishy depending on your preference.

Don't be afraid to make more than you need for dinner. They are wonderful in potato pancakes for breakfast the next morning.

Then plop them in a bowl and ladle the stew over the top. It will look something like this:

Mahogany Beef Stew with Red Wine and Hoisin Sauce
Bon Appétit | February 2002

  • 4 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 1/2 pounds boneless beef chuck roast, trimmed, cut into 2 1/2-inch pieces
  • 3 1/2 cups chopped onions
  • 2 cups Cabernet Sauvignon
  • 1 14.5-ounce can diced tomatoes with Italian herbs, undrained
  • 1/2 cup hoisin sauce*
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 pound slender carrots, peeled, cut diagonally into 1-inch lengths
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch mixed with 1 tablespoon water
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

Mashed Horseradish Potatoes with Parsnips or Turnips.


4 potatoes, cubed
2 small or 1 large Parsnip, sliced and cubed.
3 T. butter
1/4- 1/2 c. milk
1 or 2 T. of horseradish

Put potatoes and parsnip in cold salted water. Bring to a boil. Simmer until vegetables are just fork tender. Drain and return to hot pan. Add butter, milk and horseradish. Mash to desired consistency. Taste. Add more milk and horseradish to your preference. This is no time to be timid!


Beef Stew with Soul

The correct cooking techniques and ingredients rich in umami will take a basic beef stew from simply hearty to deeply flavorful.

“The biggest key for me is browning the meat well,” says alanbarnes. “Not just cooking it until it loses its reddish color, but subjecting it to very high heat (skillet, broiler, gas grill, blowtorch, whatever) until it has a really good mahogany-colored crust on the outside.”

Seasoning is also vital. “Don’t underestimate the role of salt in your stew,” advises TorontoJo. “Salt and pepper the meat before browning it. Salt the stew while it’s cooking, taste it after the salt has had a chance to blend in, add more salt if you think it needs it. I also like to use soy sauce to add saltiness and an extra boost of umami.”

Richly flavored braising liquid helps. Hounds like to use good beef stock, especially in combination with fruity red wine or a stout or ale. “Guinness is a magical ingredient paired with beef,” says kattyeyes, while joonjoon likes Chimay in stew.

Beef stew’s flavor can be punched up with umami-rich ingredients. Try minced rehydrated dried mushrooms or powdered dried mushrooms, tomato paste, or Worcestershire sauce. “A few minced anchovies sautéed with the onions after browning the meat give a nice added dimension,” says King of Northern Blvd.

For a different spin on the dish, Val recommends this recipe for mahogany beef stew with red wine and hoisin sauce, which she says is “utterly awesome with horseradish mashed potatoes.” karykat says the hoisin “adds a sweet-sour-spicy note that is good.” Both reduce the hoisin a bit to avoid making the dish too sweet.


Recipe Summary

  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 pounds trimmed beef flatiron steak or chuck, cut into 8 pieces
  • Salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 cup finely chopped onion
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped garlic
  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • One 750-milliliter bottle dry red wine
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 thyme sprig
  • One 5-ounce piece of pancetta
  • 15 pearl or small cipollini onions, peeled
  • 15 cremini mushrooms
  • 15 baby carrots, peeled
  • Sugar
  • Chopped fresh parsley, for garnish

Preheat the oven to 350°. In a large enameled cast-iron casserole, melt the butter in 1 tablespoon of the olive oil. Arrange the meat in the casserole in a single layer and season with salt and pepper. Cook over moderately high heat, turning occasionally, until browned on all sides, 8 minutes. Add the chopped onion and garlic and cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until the onion is softened, 5 minutes. Add the flour and stir to coat the meat with it. Add the wine, bay leaves and thyme, season with salt and pepper and bring to a boil, stirring to dissolve any brown bits stuck to the bottom of the pot.

Cover the casserole and transfer it to the oven. Cook the stew for 1 1/2 hours, until the meat is very tender and the sauce is flavorful.

Meanwhile, in a saucepan, cover the pancetta with 2 cups of water and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for 30 minutes. Drain the pancetta and slice it 1/2 inch thick, then cut the slices into 1-inch-wide lardons.

In a large skillet, combine the pancetta, pearl onions, mushrooms and carrots. Add the remaining 1 tablespoon of olive oil, 1/4 cup of water and a large pinch each of sugar, salt and pepper. Bring to a boil, cover and simmer until almost all of the water has evaporated, 15 minutes. Uncover and cook over high heat, tossing, until the vegetables are tender and nicely browned, about 4 minutes.

To serve, stir some of the vegetables and lardons into the stew and scatter the rest on top as a garnish. Top with a little chopped parsley and serve.