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Tracing Family Heritage Through Food

Tracing Family Heritage Through Food

Organized heritage tours are an increasing reason for travel to countries like Ireland, Germany and Italy. Especially for somewhat rootless Americans, tracing family trees seems almost as important as experiencing the culture of one's grandparents or ancestors even further back in the bloodline. A need to reconnect with family inspired writer Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan to revisit her birthplace, Singapore, and spend a year there learning to cook the food of her childhood, which she writes about in her memoir.

She tells us about her experience below:

The seed for A Tiger in the Kitchen was planted in Singapore one Chinese New Year when I found myself learning how to make the pineapple tarts that my paternal grandmother had been famous for celebrating that holiday. These buttery cookies topped with sweet pineapple jam were my favorite dessert as a child in Singapore. I always thought I would learn how to make them with my grandmother’s guidance, but she died when I was eleven.

Living in the United States as an adult, I missed my family’s cooking and my grandmother’s tarts more with each passing year. When I decided to go home to learn how to make the tarts and other Singaporean dishes, I realized I was also learning about my family and myself. I came to regard this book as a form of culinary anthropology.

In my aunties' kitchens, many of the dishes I learned were ones they made without thinking to write down the recipes to pass down to future generations. If I hadn’t asked them to teach me, these family recipes may have been lost.

Like the armchair traveler, a kitchen traveler can "visit" ancestral cultures through its cuisine. Here, The Daily Meal editors share the foods they love that help them go back to their roots.

Colman Andrews

Culture: French-Canadian

If I were cooking, I'd make a nice tourtière. The store-brought product would be maple syrup.

Jess Kapadia

Culture: India

Extra long-grain Basmati rice and split yellow lentil dal with homemade yogurt and pickled chilis.

Molly Aronica

Culture: Jewish and Italian

My grandmother's matzoh ball soup or meatballs.

Maryse Chevriere

Culture: French

French onion soup and salad with warm goat cheese. And if I could make foie gras, that too.

Yasmin Fahr

Culture: Persian

Saffron or Basmati rice to make Tah-deeg (the crispy part of the rice that forms on the bottom of the pan — it's sooo good soaked in stews).

Valaer Murray

Culture: Scottish

When I went to Scotland and visited the Murray clan region, I ate a lot of Scotch pies from little bakeries in Perthshire.

Allison Beck

Culture: German

My mom's family's yeasted German peach cake.

Arthur Bovino

Culture: Italian

Grandma's homemade tomato sauce with meatballs.

This post was originally published on Februrary 16, 2011


Savor Your Family's History: Share Your Treasured Recipes

You might have a family heirloom hidden in your kitchen&mdashand it isn&rsquot the china.

That prized possession is a favorite recipe that triggers the warm memories associated with loved ones. It brings back the memories of grandma&rsquos special Sunday cookies or the traditional dishes prepared by mom&rsquos busy cooking on Christmas Eve. This cherished recipe, often enjoyed at family celebrations or on holidays, is a heritage recipe that connects you to your family and its traditions. It tells the story of people, places and special memories of your life.

&ldquoNo matter where you live and no matter where your family is from, in all cultures throughout the world, we have all gathered joyously around food in the kitchen, around the dinner or breakfast table, centered around homemade dishes prepared thoughtfully by a love one. We perpetuate these wonderful experiences and, in a very real sense, honor our heritage when we share these wonderful recipes with our children and grandchildren,&rdquo said Stephen Rockwood, president and chief executive officer of FamilySearch.

In conjunction with RootsTech 2017, FamilySearch, the world&rsquos largest genealogical organization and a nonprofit, is launching a campaign to preserve and share these recipe stories. Individuals can share their recipes online by uploading recipes, the stories behind them and photos to familysearch.org/recipes. Family recipe stories can be shared on social media with the hashtag #FamilySearch. The campaign was launched at RootsTech, the world class family history event held in Salt Lake City, Utah. Keynote addresses by Steve Rockwood and Food Network&rsquos Cake Boss Buddy Valastro related fond memories and experiences of family homemade dishes and the need to preserve them for future generations. In the case of Valastro, the family&rsquos love of food has morphed into a business empire.

Valastro also judged a cake competition at RootsTech 2017 sponsored by family-owned and operated Orson H. Gygi, a very popular Utah kitchen and restaurant supply company in the Intermountain West. The company donated $20,000 worth of prizes for the competition.

Gygi&rsquos General Manager, Brad McDonald, said FamilySearch&rsquos emphasis on family and fostering a sense of identity and belonging that occur in the kitchen and around the table fit nicely with the focus of his company, founded by his grandfather Orson Gygi 70 years ago. He sees the company as the distributor of the supplies and tools used to create these food heritage opportunities, to build family traditions.

In fact, one of his family&rsquos traditions started years ago at a company kitchen. A daughter suggested the family get together to make Thanksgiving pies. Now, 15 years later, McDonald, his wife Mindy and their six daughters and their families, continue to gather annually to make about 30 pies to share with their extended families.

Si Foster has shared her heritage recipe, &ldquoTried and True Chocolate Chip Cookies,&rdquo to thousands in her Utah cooking classes and online at her blog abountifulkitchen.com. The recipe has a heritage story. It was developed after her son, Stephen, and his friend, Spencer, decided in high school to take treats every Sunday to those who needed uplifting.

After some hits and misses with the cookies, Foster developed her recipe that includes special instructions so the cookies turn out every time at both high altitude and sea level. She hears frequently from people who have essentially adopted her cookie-making formula as their own heritage recipe.

Anne Metcalf thanks her proselyting mission to Singapore for her treasured Vietnamese spring roll recipe. When she was on her mission, she wrote her mother, Ngoc Chung Metcalf, a Vietnam native, asking for a copy of her delicious spring roll recipe. Once or twice a year, when Anne was a child, her mother would make a large batch of rolls from scratch by chopping the vegetables and grinding her own pork. Metcalf would help by rolling the delicacies. Her mother always shared the rolls with appreciative neighbors. &ldquoEveryone loved them,&rdquo Metcalf said.

But her mother never worked from a recipe. So, Metcalf asked her to calculate the recipe&rsquos measurements and mail them to her on her mission. She&rsquos grateful she made the request. &ldquoThe recipe is in my mother&rsquos handwriting and seeing the recipe is very special to me because she has passed,&rdquo Metcalf said.

For Thom Reed, it only takes a bite of sweet potato pie to be transported back to his grandmother&rsquos kitchen. Theora Reed grew up in Mississippi and took her Southern cooking skills north to Gary, Indiana, where Thom formed his fond childhood memories of her. Holidays and special occasions meant Grandma Theora&rsquos sweet potato pie.


Savor Your Family's History: Share Your Treasured Recipes

You might have a family heirloom hidden in your kitchen&mdashand it isn&rsquot the china.

That prized possession is a favorite recipe that triggers the warm memories associated with loved ones. It brings back the memories of grandma&rsquos special Sunday cookies or the traditional dishes prepared by mom&rsquos busy cooking on Christmas Eve. This cherished recipe, often enjoyed at family celebrations or on holidays, is a heritage recipe that connects you to your family and its traditions. It tells the story of people, places and special memories of your life.

&ldquoNo matter where you live and no matter where your family is from, in all cultures throughout the world, we have all gathered joyously around food in the kitchen, around the dinner or breakfast table, centered around homemade dishes prepared thoughtfully by a love one. We perpetuate these wonderful experiences and, in a very real sense, honor our heritage when we share these wonderful recipes with our children and grandchildren,&rdquo said Stephen Rockwood, president and chief executive officer of FamilySearch.

In conjunction with RootsTech 2017, FamilySearch, the world&rsquos largest genealogical organization and a nonprofit, is launching a campaign to preserve and share these recipe stories. Individuals can share their recipes online by uploading recipes, the stories behind them and photos to familysearch.org/recipes. Family recipe stories can be shared on social media with the hashtag #FamilySearch. The campaign was launched at RootsTech, the world class family history event held in Salt Lake City, Utah. Keynote addresses by Steve Rockwood and Food Network&rsquos Cake Boss Buddy Valastro related fond memories and experiences of family homemade dishes and the need to preserve them for future generations. In the case of Valastro, the family&rsquos love of food has morphed into a business empire.

Valastro also judged a cake competition at RootsTech 2017 sponsored by family-owned and operated Orson H. Gygi, a very popular Utah kitchen and restaurant supply company in the Intermountain West. The company donated $20,000 worth of prizes for the competition.

Gygi&rsquos General Manager, Brad McDonald, said FamilySearch&rsquos emphasis on family and fostering a sense of identity and belonging that occur in the kitchen and around the table fit nicely with the focus of his company, founded by his grandfather Orson Gygi 70 years ago. He sees the company as the distributor of the supplies and tools used to create these food heritage opportunities, to build family traditions.

In fact, one of his family&rsquos traditions started years ago at a company kitchen. A daughter suggested the family get together to make Thanksgiving pies. Now, 15 years later, McDonald, his wife Mindy and their six daughters and their families, continue to gather annually to make about 30 pies to share with their extended families.

Si Foster has shared her heritage recipe, &ldquoTried and True Chocolate Chip Cookies,&rdquo to thousands in her Utah cooking classes and online at her blog abountifulkitchen.com. The recipe has a heritage story. It was developed after her son, Stephen, and his friend, Spencer, decided in high school to take treats every Sunday to those who needed uplifting.

After some hits and misses with the cookies, Foster developed her recipe that includes special instructions so the cookies turn out every time at both high altitude and sea level. She hears frequently from people who have essentially adopted her cookie-making formula as their own heritage recipe.

Anne Metcalf thanks her proselyting mission to Singapore for her treasured Vietnamese spring roll recipe. When she was on her mission, she wrote her mother, Ngoc Chung Metcalf, a Vietnam native, asking for a copy of her delicious spring roll recipe. Once or twice a year, when Anne was a child, her mother would make a large batch of rolls from scratch by chopping the vegetables and grinding her own pork. Metcalf would help by rolling the delicacies. Her mother always shared the rolls with appreciative neighbors. &ldquoEveryone loved them,&rdquo Metcalf said.

But her mother never worked from a recipe. So, Metcalf asked her to calculate the recipe&rsquos measurements and mail them to her on her mission. She&rsquos grateful she made the request. &ldquoThe recipe is in my mother&rsquos handwriting and seeing the recipe is very special to me because she has passed,&rdquo Metcalf said.

For Thom Reed, it only takes a bite of sweet potato pie to be transported back to his grandmother&rsquos kitchen. Theora Reed grew up in Mississippi and took her Southern cooking skills north to Gary, Indiana, where Thom formed his fond childhood memories of her. Holidays and special occasions meant Grandma Theora&rsquos sweet potato pie.


Savor Your Family's History: Share Your Treasured Recipes

You might have a family heirloom hidden in your kitchen&mdashand it isn&rsquot the china.

That prized possession is a favorite recipe that triggers the warm memories associated with loved ones. It brings back the memories of grandma&rsquos special Sunday cookies or the traditional dishes prepared by mom&rsquos busy cooking on Christmas Eve. This cherished recipe, often enjoyed at family celebrations or on holidays, is a heritage recipe that connects you to your family and its traditions. It tells the story of people, places and special memories of your life.

&ldquoNo matter where you live and no matter where your family is from, in all cultures throughout the world, we have all gathered joyously around food in the kitchen, around the dinner or breakfast table, centered around homemade dishes prepared thoughtfully by a love one. We perpetuate these wonderful experiences and, in a very real sense, honor our heritage when we share these wonderful recipes with our children and grandchildren,&rdquo said Stephen Rockwood, president and chief executive officer of FamilySearch.

In conjunction with RootsTech 2017, FamilySearch, the world&rsquos largest genealogical organization and a nonprofit, is launching a campaign to preserve and share these recipe stories. Individuals can share their recipes online by uploading recipes, the stories behind them and photos to familysearch.org/recipes. Family recipe stories can be shared on social media with the hashtag #FamilySearch. The campaign was launched at RootsTech, the world class family history event held in Salt Lake City, Utah. Keynote addresses by Steve Rockwood and Food Network&rsquos Cake Boss Buddy Valastro related fond memories and experiences of family homemade dishes and the need to preserve them for future generations. In the case of Valastro, the family&rsquos love of food has morphed into a business empire.

Valastro also judged a cake competition at RootsTech 2017 sponsored by family-owned and operated Orson H. Gygi, a very popular Utah kitchen and restaurant supply company in the Intermountain West. The company donated $20,000 worth of prizes for the competition.

Gygi&rsquos General Manager, Brad McDonald, said FamilySearch&rsquos emphasis on family and fostering a sense of identity and belonging that occur in the kitchen and around the table fit nicely with the focus of his company, founded by his grandfather Orson Gygi 70 years ago. He sees the company as the distributor of the supplies and tools used to create these food heritage opportunities, to build family traditions.

In fact, one of his family&rsquos traditions started years ago at a company kitchen. A daughter suggested the family get together to make Thanksgiving pies. Now, 15 years later, McDonald, his wife Mindy and their six daughters and their families, continue to gather annually to make about 30 pies to share with their extended families.

Si Foster has shared her heritage recipe, &ldquoTried and True Chocolate Chip Cookies,&rdquo to thousands in her Utah cooking classes and online at her blog abountifulkitchen.com. The recipe has a heritage story. It was developed after her son, Stephen, and his friend, Spencer, decided in high school to take treats every Sunday to those who needed uplifting.

After some hits and misses with the cookies, Foster developed her recipe that includes special instructions so the cookies turn out every time at both high altitude and sea level. She hears frequently from people who have essentially adopted her cookie-making formula as their own heritage recipe.

Anne Metcalf thanks her proselyting mission to Singapore for her treasured Vietnamese spring roll recipe. When she was on her mission, she wrote her mother, Ngoc Chung Metcalf, a Vietnam native, asking for a copy of her delicious spring roll recipe. Once or twice a year, when Anne was a child, her mother would make a large batch of rolls from scratch by chopping the vegetables and grinding her own pork. Metcalf would help by rolling the delicacies. Her mother always shared the rolls with appreciative neighbors. &ldquoEveryone loved them,&rdquo Metcalf said.

But her mother never worked from a recipe. So, Metcalf asked her to calculate the recipe&rsquos measurements and mail them to her on her mission. She&rsquos grateful she made the request. &ldquoThe recipe is in my mother&rsquos handwriting and seeing the recipe is very special to me because she has passed,&rdquo Metcalf said.

For Thom Reed, it only takes a bite of sweet potato pie to be transported back to his grandmother&rsquos kitchen. Theora Reed grew up in Mississippi and took her Southern cooking skills north to Gary, Indiana, where Thom formed his fond childhood memories of her. Holidays and special occasions meant Grandma Theora&rsquos sweet potato pie.


Savor Your Family's History: Share Your Treasured Recipes

You might have a family heirloom hidden in your kitchen&mdashand it isn&rsquot the china.

That prized possession is a favorite recipe that triggers the warm memories associated with loved ones. It brings back the memories of grandma&rsquos special Sunday cookies or the traditional dishes prepared by mom&rsquos busy cooking on Christmas Eve. This cherished recipe, often enjoyed at family celebrations or on holidays, is a heritage recipe that connects you to your family and its traditions. It tells the story of people, places and special memories of your life.

&ldquoNo matter where you live and no matter where your family is from, in all cultures throughout the world, we have all gathered joyously around food in the kitchen, around the dinner or breakfast table, centered around homemade dishes prepared thoughtfully by a love one. We perpetuate these wonderful experiences and, in a very real sense, honor our heritage when we share these wonderful recipes with our children and grandchildren,&rdquo said Stephen Rockwood, president and chief executive officer of FamilySearch.

In conjunction with RootsTech 2017, FamilySearch, the world&rsquos largest genealogical organization and a nonprofit, is launching a campaign to preserve and share these recipe stories. Individuals can share their recipes online by uploading recipes, the stories behind them and photos to familysearch.org/recipes. Family recipe stories can be shared on social media with the hashtag #FamilySearch. The campaign was launched at RootsTech, the world class family history event held in Salt Lake City, Utah. Keynote addresses by Steve Rockwood and Food Network&rsquos Cake Boss Buddy Valastro related fond memories and experiences of family homemade dishes and the need to preserve them for future generations. In the case of Valastro, the family&rsquos love of food has morphed into a business empire.

Valastro also judged a cake competition at RootsTech 2017 sponsored by family-owned and operated Orson H. Gygi, a very popular Utah kitchen and restaurant supply company in the Intermountain West. The company donated $20,000 worth of prizes for the competition.

Gygi&rsquos General Manager, Brad McDonald, said FamilySearch&rsquos emphasis on family and fostering a sense of identity and belonging that occur in the kitchen and around the table fit nicely with the focus of his company, founded by his grandfather Orson Gygi 70 years ago. He sees the company as the distributor of the supplies and tools used to create these food heritage opportunities, to build family traditions.

In fact, one of his family&rsquos traditions started years ago at a company kitchen. A daughter suggested the family get together to make Thanksgiving pies. Now, 15 years later, McDonald, his wife Mindy and their six daughters and their families, continue to gather annually to make about 30 pies to share with their extended families.

Si Foster has shared her heritage recipe, &ldquoTried and True Chocolate Chip Cookies,&rdquo to thousands in her Utah cooking classes and online at her blog abountifulkitchen.com. The recipe has a heritage story. It was developed after her son, Stephen, and his friend, Spencer, decided in high school to take treats every Sunday to those who needed uplifting.

After some hits and misses with the cookies, Foster developed her recipe that includes special instructions so the cookies turn out every time at both high altitude and sea level. She hears frequently from people who have essentially adopted her cookie-making formula as their own heritage recipe.

Anne Metcalf thanks her proselyting mission to Singapore for her treasured Vietnamese spring roll recipe. When she was on her mission, she wrote her mother, Ngoc Chung Metcalf, a Vietnam native, asking for a copy of her delicious spring roll recipe. Once or twice a year, when Anne was a child, her mother would make a large batch of rolls from scratch by chopping the vegetables and grinding her own pork. Metcalf would help by rolling the delicacies. Her mother always shared the rolls with appreciative neighbors. &ldquoEveryone loved them,&rdquo Metcalf said.

But her mother never worked from a recipe. So, Metcalf asked her to calculate the recipe&rsquos measurements and mail them to her on her mission. She&rsquos grateful she made the request. &ldquoThe recipe is in my mother&rsquos handwriting and seeing the recipe is very special to me because she has passed,&rdquo Metcalf said.

For Thom Reed, it only takes a bite of sweet potato pie to be transported back to his grandmother&rsquos kitchen. Theora Reed grew up in Mississippi and took her Southern cooking skills north to Gary, Indiana, where Thom formed his fond childhood memories of her. Holidays and special occasions meant Grandma Theora&rsquos sweet potato pie.


Savor Your Family's History: Share Your Treasured Recipes

You might have a family heirloom hidden in your kitchen&mdashand it isn&rsquot the china.

That prized possession is a favorite recipe that triggers the warm memories associated with loved ones. It brings back the memories of grandma&rsquos special Sunday cookies or the traditional dishes prepared by mom&rsquos busy cooking on Christmas Eve. This cherished recipe, often enjoyed at family celebrations or on holidays, is a heritage recipe that connects you to your family and its traditions. It tells the story of people, places and special memories of your life.

&ldquoNo matter where you live and no matter where your family is from, in all cultures throughout the world, we have all gathered joyously around food in the kitchen, around the dinner or breakfast table, centered around homemade dishes prepared thoughtfully by a love one. We perpetuate these wonderful experiences and, in a very real sense, honor our heritage when we share these wonderful recipes with our children and grandchildren,&rdquo said Stephen Rockwood, president and chief executive officer of FamilySearch.

In conjunction with RootsTech 2017, FamilySearch, the world&rsquos largest genealogical organization and a nonprofit, is launching a campaign to preserve and share these recipe stories. Individuals can share their recipes online by uploading recipes, the stories behind them and photos to familysearch.org/recipes. Family recipe stories can be shared on social media with the hashtag #FamilySearch. The campaign was launched at RootsTech, the world class family history event held in Salt Lake City, Utah. Keynote addresses by Steve Rockwood and Food Network&rsquos Cake Boss Buddy Valastro related fond memories and experiences of family homemade dishes and the need to preserve them for future generations. In the case of Valastro, the family&rsquos love of food has morphed into a business empire.

Valastro also judged a cake competition at RootsTech 2017 sponsored by family-owned and operated Orson H. Gygi, a very popular Utah kitchen and restaurant supply company in the Intermountain West. The company donated $20,000 worth of prizes for the competition.

Gygi&rsquos General Manager, Brad McDonald, said FamilySearch&rsquos emphasis on family and fostering a sense of identity and belonging that occur in the kitchen and around the table fit nicely with the focus of his company, founded by his grandfather Orson Gygi 70 years ago. He sees the company as the distributor of the supplies and tools used to create these food heritage opportunities, to build family traditions.

In fact, one of his family&rsquos traditions started years ago at a company kitchen. A daughter suggested the family get together to make Thanksgiving pies. Now, 15 years later, McDonald, his wife Mindy and their six daughters and their families, continue to gather annually to make about 30 pies to share with their extended families.

Si Foster has shared her heritage recipe, &ldquoTried and True Chocolate Chip Cookies,&rdquo to thousands in her Utah cooking classes and online at her blog abountifulkitchen.com. The recipe has a heritage story. It was developed after her son, Stephen, and his friend, Spencer, decided in high school to take treats every Sunday to those who needed uplifting.

After some hits and misses with the cookies, Foster developed her recipe that includes special instructions so the cookies turn out every time at both high altitude and sea level. She hears frequently from people who have essentially adopted her cookie-making formula as their own heritage recipe.

Anne Metcalf thanks her proselyting mission to Singapore for her treasured Vietnamese spring roll recipe. When she was on her mission, she wrote her mother, Ngoc Chung Metcalf, a Vietnam native, asking for a copy of her delicious spring roll recipe. Once or twice a year, when Anne was a child, her mother would make a large batch of rolls from scratch by chopping the vegetables and grinding her own pork. Metcalf would help by rolling the delicacies. Her mother always shared the rolls with appreciative neighbors. &ldquoEveryone loved them,&rdquo Metcalf said.

But her mother never worked from a recipe. So, Metcalf asked her to calculate the recipe&rsquos measurements and mail them to her on her mission. She&rsquos grateful she made the request. &ldquoThe recipe is in my mother&rsquos handwriting and seeing the recipe is very special to me because she has passed,&rdquo Metcalf said.

For Thom Reed, it only takes a bite of sweet potato pie to be transported back to his grandmother&rsquos kitchen. Theora Reed grew up in Mississippi and took her Southern cooking skills north to Gary, Indiana, where Thom formed his fond childhood memories of her. Holidays and special occasions meant Grandma Theora&rsquos sweet potato pie.


Savor Your Family's History: Share Your Treasured Recipes

You might have a family heirloom hidden in your kitchen&mdashand it isn&rsquot the china.

That prized possession is a favorite recipe that triggers the warm memories associated with loved ones. It brings back the memories of grandma&rsquos special Sunday cookies or the traditional dishes prepared by mom&rsquos busy cooking on Christmas Eve. This cherished recipe, often enjoyed at family celebrations or on holidays, is a heritage recipe that connects you to your family and its traditions. It tells the story of people, places and special memories of your life.

&ldquoNo matter where you live and no matter where your family is from, in all cultures throughout the world, we have all gathered joyously around food in the kitchen, around the dinner or breakfast table, centered around homemade dishes prepared thoughtfully by a love one. We perpetuate these wonderful experiences and, in a very real sense, honor our heritage when we share these wonderful recipes with our children and grandchildren,&rdquo said Stephen Rockwood, president and chief executive officer of FamilySearch.

In conjunction with RootsTech 2017, FamilySearch, the world&rsquos largest genealogical organization and a nonprofit, is launching a campaign to preserve and share these recipe stories. Individuals can share their recipes online by uploading recipes, the stories behind them and photos to familysearch.org/recipes. Family recipe stories can be shared on social media with the hashtag #FamilySearch. The campaign was launched at RootsTech, the world class family history event held in Salt Lake City, Utah. Keynote addresses by Steve Rockwood and Food Network&rsquos Cake Boss Buddy Valastro related fond memories and experiences of family homemade dishes and the need to preserve them for future generations. In the case of Valastro, the family&rsquos love of food has morphed into a business empire.

Valastro also judged a cake competition at RootsTech 2017 sponsored by family-owned and operated Orson H. Gygi, a very popular Utah kitchen and restaurant supply company in the Intermountain West. The company donated $20,000 worth of prizes for the competition.

Gygi&rsquos General Manager, Brad McDonald, said FamilySearch&rsquos emphasis on family and fostering a sense of identity and belonging that occur in the kitchen and around the table fit nicely with the focus of his company, founded by his grandfather Orson Gygi 70 years ago. He sees the company as the distributor of the supplies and tools used to create these food heritage opportunities, to build family traditions.

In fact, one of his family&rsquos traditions started years ago at a company kitchen. A daughter suggested the family get together to make Thanksgiving pies. Now, 15 years later, McDonald, his wife Mindy and their six daughters and their families, continue to gather annually to make about 30 pies to share with their extended families.

Si Foster has shared her heritage recipe, &ldquoTried and True Chocolate Chip Cookies,&rdquo to thousands in her Utah cooking classes and online at her blog abountifulkitchen.com. The recipe has a heritage story. It was developed after her son, Stephen, and his friend, Spencer, decided in high school to take treats every Sunday to those who needed uplifting.

After some hits and misses with the cookies, Foster developed her recipe that includes special instructions so the cookies turn out every time at both high altitude and sea level. She hears frequently from people who have essentially adopted her cookie-making formula as their own heritage recipe.

Anne Metcalf thanks her proselyting mission to Singapore for her treasured Vietnamese spring roll recipe. When she was on her mission, she wrote her mother, Ngoc Chung Metcalf, a Vietnam native, asking for a copy of her delicious spring roll recipe. Once or twice a year, when Anne was a child, her mother would make a large batch of rolls from scratch by chopping the vegetables and grinding her own pork. Metcalf would help by rolling the delicacies. Her mother always shared the rolls with appreciative neighbors. &ldquoEveryone loved them,&rdquo Metcalf said.

But her mother never worked from a recipe. So, Metcalf asked her to calculate the recipe&rsquos measurements and mail them to her on her mission. She&rsquos grateful she made the request. &ldquoThe recipe is in my mother&rsquos handwriting and seeing the recipe is very special to me because she has passed,&rdquo Metcalf said.

For Thom Reed, it only takes a bite of sweet potato pie to be transported back to his grandmother&rsquos kitchen. Theora Reed grew up in Mississippi and took her Southern cooking skills north to Gary, Indiana, where Thom formed his fond childhood memories of her. Holidays and special occasions meant Grandma Theora&rsquos sweet potato pie.


Savor Your Family's History: Share Your Treasured Recipes

You might have a family heirloom hidden in your kitchen&mdashand it isn&rsquot the china.

That prized possession is a favorite recipe that triggers the warm memories associated with loved ones. It brings back the memories of grandma&rsquos special Sunday cookies or the traditional dishes prepared by mom&rsquos busy cooking on Christmas Eve. This cherished recipe, often enjoyed at family celebrations or on holidays, is a heritage recipe that connects you to your family and its traditions. It tells the story of people, places and special memories of your life.

&ldquoNo matter where you live and no matter where your family is from, in all cultures throughout the world, we have all gathered joyously around food in the kitchen, around the dinner or breakfast table, centered around homemade dishes prepared thoughtfully by a love one. We perpetuate these wonderful experiences and, in a very real sense, honor our heritage when we share these wonderful recipes with our children and grandchildren,&rdquo said Stephen Rockwood, president and chief executive officer of FamilySearch.

In conjunction with RootsTech 2017, FamilySearch, the world&rsquos largest genealogical organization and a nonprofit, is launching a campaign to preserve and share these recipe stories. Individuals can share their recipes online by uploading recipes, the stories behind them and photos to familysearch.org/recipes. Family recipe stories can be shared on social media with the hashtag #FamilySearch. The campaign was launched at RootsTech, the world class family history event held in Salt Lake City, Utah. Keynote addresses by Steve Rockwood and Food Network&rsquos Cake Boss Buddy Valastro related fond memories and experiences of family homemade dishes and the need to preserve them for future generations. In the case of Valastro, the family&rsquos love of food has morphed into a business empire.

Valastro also judged a cake competition at RootsTech 2017 sponsored by family-owned and operated Orson H. Gygi, a very popular Utah kitchen and restaurant supply company in the Intermountain West. The company donated $20,000 worth of prizes for the competition.

Gygi&rsquos General Manager, Brad McDonald, said FamilySearch&rsquos emphasis on family and fostering a sense of identity and belonging that occur in the kitchen and around the table fit nicely with the focus of his company, founded by his grandfather Orson Gygi 70 years ago. He sees the company as the distributor of the supplies and tools used to create these food heritage opportunities, to build family traditions.

In fact, one of his family&rsquos traditions started years ago at a company kitchen. A daughter suggested the family get together to make Thanksgiving pies. Now, 15 years later, McDonald, his wife Mindy and their six daughters and their families, continue to gather annually to make about 30 pies to share with their extended families.

Si Foster has shared her heritage recipe, &ldquoTried and True Chocolate Chip Cookies,&rdquo to thousands in her Utah cooking classes and online at her blog abountifulkitchen.com. The recipe has a heritage story. It was developed after her son, Stephen, and his friend, Spencer, decided in high school to take treats every Sunday to those who needed uplifting.

After some hits and misses with the cookies, Foster developed her recipe that includes special instructions so the cookies turn out every time at both high altitude and sea level. She hears frequently from people who have essentially adopted her cookie-making formula as their own heritage recipe.

Anne Metcalf thanks her proselyting mission to Singapore for her treasured Vietnamese spring roll recipe. When she was on her mission, she wrote her mother, Ngoc Chung Metcalf, a Vietnam native, asking for a copy of her delicious spring roll recipe. Once or twice a year, when Anne was a child, her mother would make a large batch of rolls from scratch by chopping the vegetables and grinding her own pork. Metcalf would help by rolling the delicacies. Her mother always shared the rolls with appreciative neighbors. &ldquoEveryone loved them,&rdquo Metcalf said.

But her mother never worked from a recipe. So, Metcalf asked her to calculate the recipe&rsquos measurements and mail them to her on her mission. She&rsquos grateful she made the request. &ldquoThe recipe is in my mother&rsquos handwriting and seeing the recipe is very special to me because she has passed,&rdquo Metcalf said.

For Thom Reed, it only takes a bite of sweet potato pie to be transported back to his grandmother&rsquos kitchen. Theora Reed grew up in Mississippi and took her Southern cooking skills north to Gary, Indiana, where Thom formed his fond childhood memories of her. Holidays and special occasions meant Grandma Theora&rsquos sweet potato pie.


Savor Your Family's History: Share Your Treasured Recipes

You might have a family heirloom hidden in your kitchen&mdashand it isn&rsquot the china.

That prized possession is a favorite recipe that triggers the warm memories associated with loved ones. It brings back the memories of grandma&rsquos special Sunday cookies or the traditional dishes prepared by mom&rsquos busy cooking on Christmas Eve. This cherished recipe, often enjoyed at family celebrations or on holidays, is a heritage recipe that connects you to your family and its traditions. It tells the story of people, places and special memories of your life.

&ldquoNo matter where you live and no matter where your family is from, in all cultures throughout the world, we have all gathered joyously around food in the kitchen, around the dinner or breakfast table, centered around homemade dishes prepared thoughtfully by a love one. We perpetuate these wonderful experiences and, in a very real sense, honor our heritage when we share these wonderful recipes with our children and grandchildren,&rdquo said Stephen Rockwood, president and chief executive officer of FamilySearch.

In conjunction with RootsTech 2017, FamilySearch, the world&rsquos largest genealogical organization and a nonprofit, is launching a campaign to preserve and share these recipe stories. Individuals can share their recipes online by uploading recipes, the stories behind them and photos to familysearch.org/recipes. Family recipe stories can be shared on social media with the hashtag #FamilySearch. The campaign was launched at RootsTech, the world class family history event held in Salt Lake City, Utah. Keynote addresses by Steve Rockwood and Food Network&rsquos Cake Boss Buddy Valastro related fond memories and experiences of family homemade dishes and the need to preserve them for future generations. In the case of Valastro, the family&rsquos love of food has morphed into a business empire.

Valastro also judged a cake competition at RootsTech 2017 sponsored by family-owned and operated Orson H. Gygi, a very popular Utah kitchen and restaurant supply company in the Intermountain West. The company donated $20,000 worth of prizes for the competition.

Gygi&rsquos General Manager, Brad McDonald, said FamilySearch&rsquos emphasis on family and fostering a sense of identity and belonging that occur in the kitchen and around the table fit nicely with the focus of his company, founded by his grandfather Orson Gygi 70 years ago. He sees the company as the distributor of the supplies and tools used to create these food heritage opportunities, to build family traditions.

In fact, one of his family&rsquos traditions started years ago at a company kitchen. A daughter suggested the family get together to make Thanksgiving pies. Now, 15 years later, McDonald, his wife Mindy and their six daughters and their families, continue to gather annually to make about 30 pies to share with their extended families.

Si Foster has shared her heritage recipe, &ldquoTried and True Chocolate Chip Cookies,&rdquo to thousands in her Utah cooking classes and online at her blog abountifulkitchen.com. The recipe has a heritage story. It was developed after her son, Stephen, and his friend, Spencer, decided in high school to take treats every Sunday to those who needed uplifting.

After some hits and misses with the cookies, Foster developed her recipe that includes special instructions so the cookies turn out every time at both high altitude and sea level. She hears frequently from people who have essentially adopted her cookie-making formula as their own heritage recipe.

Anne Metcalf thanks her proselyting mission to Singapore for her treasured Vietnamese spring roll recipe. When she was on her mission, she wrote her mother, Ngoc Chung Metcalf, a Vietnam native, asking for a copy of her delicious spring roll recipe. Once or twice a year, when Anne was a child, her mother would make a large batch of rolls from scratch by chopping the vegetables and grinding her own pork. Metcalf would help by rolling the delicacies. Her mother always shared the rolls with appreciative neighbors. &ldquoEveryone loved them,&rdquo Metcalf said.

But her mother never worked from a recipe. So, Metcalf asked her to calculate the recipe&rsquos measurements and mail them to her on her mission. She&rsquos grateful she made the request. &ldquoThe recipe is in my mother&rsquos handwriting and seeing the recipe is very special to me because she has passed,&rdquo Metcalf said.

For Thom Reed, it only takes a bite of sweet potato pie to be transported back to his grandmother&rsquos kitchen. Theora Reed grew up in Mississippi and took her Southern cooking skills north to Gary, Indiana, where Thom formed his fond childhood memories of her. Holidays and special occasions meant Grandma Theora&rsquos sweet potato pie.


Savor Your Family's History: Share Your Treasured Recipes

You might have a family heirloom hidden in your kitchen&mdashand it isn&rsquot the china.

That prized possession is a favorite recipe that triggers the warm memories associated with loved ones. It brings back the memories of grandma&rsquos special Sunday cookies or the traditional dishes prepared by mom&rsquos busy cooking on Christmas Eve. This cherished recipe, often enjoyed at family celebrations or on holidays, is a heritage recipe that connects you to your family and its traditions. It tells the story of people, places and special memories of your life.

&ldquoNo matter where you live and no matter where your family is from, in all cultures throughout the world, we have all gathered joyously around food in the kitchen, around the dinner or breakfast table, centered around homemade dishes prepared thoughtfully by a love one. We perpetuate these wonderful experiences and, in a very real sense, honor our heritage when we share these wonderful recipes with our children and grandchildren,&rdquo said Stephen Rockwood, president and chief executive officer of FamilySearch.

In conjunction with RootsTech 2017, FamilySearch, the world&rsquos largest genealogical organization and a nonprofit, is launching a campaign to preserve and share these recipe stories. Individuals can share their recipes online by uploading recipes, the stories behind them and photos to familysearch.org/recipes. Family recipe stories can be shared on social media with the hashtag #FamilySearch. The campaign was launched at RootsTech, the world class family history event held in Salt Lake City, Utah. Keynote addresses by Steve Rockwood and Food Network&rsquos Cake Boss Buddy Valastro related fond memories and experiences of family homemade dishes and the need to preserve them for future generations. In the case of Valastro, the family&rsquos love of food has morphed into a business empire.

Valastro also judged a cake competition at RootsTech 2017 sponsored by family-owned and operated Orson H. Gygi, a very popular Utah kitchen and restaurant supply company in the Intermountain West. The company donated $20,000 worth of prizes for the competition.

Gygi&rsquos General Manager, Brad McDonald, said FamilySearch&rsquos emphasis on family and fostering a sense of identity and belonging that occur in the kitchen and around the table fit nicely with the focus of his company, founded by his grandfather Orson Gygi 70 years ago. He sees the company as the distributor of the supplies and tools used to create these food heritage opportunities, to build family traditions.

In fact, one of his family&rsquos traditions started years ago at a company kitchen. A daughter suggested the family get together to make Thanksgiving pies. Now, 15 years later, McDonald, his wife Mindy and their six daughters and their families, continue to gather annually to make about 30 pies to share with their extended families.

Si Foster has shared her heritage recipe, &ldquoTried and True Chocolate Chip Cookies,&rdquo to thousands in her Utah cooking classes and online at her blog abountifulkitchen.com. The recipe has a heritage story. It was developed after her son, Stephen, and his friend, Spencer, decided in high school to take treats every Sunday to those who needed uplifting.

After some hits and misses with the cookies, Foster developed her recipe that includes special instructions so the cookies turn out every time at both high altitude and sea level. She hears frequently from people who have essentially adopted her cookie-making formula as their own heritage recipe.

Anne Metcalf thanks her proselyting mission to Singapore for her treasured Vietnamese spring roll recipe. When she was on her mission, she wrote her mother, Ngoc Chung Metcalf, a Vietnam native, asking for a copy of her delicious spring roll recipe. Once or twice a year, when Anne was a child, her mother would make a large batch of rolls from scratch by chopping the vegetables and grinding her own pork. Metcalf would help by rolling the delicacies. Her mother always shared the rolls with appreciative neighbors. &ldquoEveryone loved them,&rdquo Metcalf said.

But her mother never worked from a recipe. So, Metcalf asked her to calculate the recipe&rsquos measurements and mail them to her on her mission. She&rsquos grateful she made the request. &ldquoThe recipe is in my mother&rsquos handwriting and seeing the recipe is very special to me because she has passed,&rdquo Metcalf said.

For Thom Reed, it only takes a bite of sweet potato pie to be transported back to his grandmother&rsquos kitchen. Theora Reed grew up in Mississippi and took her Southern cooking skills north to Gary, Indiana, where Thom formed his fond childhood memories of her. Holidays and special occasions meant Grandma Theora&rsquos sweet potato pie.


Savor Your Family's History: Share Your Treasured Recipes

You might have a family heirloom hidden in your kitchen&mdashand it isn&rsquot the china.

That prized possession is a favorite recipe that triggers the warm memories associated with loved ones. It brings back the memories of grandma&rsquos special Sunday cookies or the traditional dishes prepared by mom&rsquos busy cooking on Christmas Eve. This cherished recipe, often enjoyed at family celebrations or on holidays, is a heritage recipe that connects you to your family and its traditions. It tells the story of people, places and special memories of your life.

&ldquoNo matter where you live and no matter where your family is from, in all cultures throughout the world, we have all gathered joyously around food in the kitchen, around the dinner or breakfast table, centered around homemade dishes prepared thoughtfully by a love one. We perpetuate these wonderful experiences and, in a very real sense, honor our heritage when we share these wonderful recipes with our children and grandchildren,&rdquo said Stephen Rockwood, president and chief executive officer of FamilySearch.

In conjunction with RootsTech 2017, FamilySearch, the world&rsquos largest genealogical organization and a nonprofit, is launching a campaign to preserve and share these recipe stories. Individuals can share their recipes online by uploading recipes, the stories behind them and photos to familysearch.org/recipes. Family recipe stories can be shared on social media with the hashtag #FamilySearch. The campaign was launched at RootsTech, the world class family history event held in Salt Lake City, Utah. Keynote addresses by Steve Rockwood and Food Network&rsquos Cake Boss Buddy Valastro related fond memories and experiences of family homemade dishes and the need to preserve them for future generations. In the case of Valastro, the family&rsquos love of food has morphed into a business empire.

Valastro also judged a cake competition at RootsTech 2017 sponsored by family-owned and operated Orson H. Gygi, a very popular Utah kitchen and restaurant supply company in the Intermountain West. The company donated $20,000 worth of prizes for the competition.

Gygi&rsquos General Manager, Brad McDonald, said FamilySearch&rsquos emphasis on family and fostering a sense of identity and belonging that occur in the kitchen and around the table fit nicely with the focus of his company, founded by his grandfather Orson Gygi 70 years ago. He sees the company as the distributor of the supplies and tools used to create these food heritage opportunities, to build family traditions.

In fact, one of his family&rsquos traditions started years ago at a company kitchen. A daughter suggested the family get together to make Thanksgiving pies. Now, 15 years later, McDonald, his wife Mindy and their six daughters and their families, continue to gather annually to make about 30 pies to share with their extended families.

Si Foster has shared her heritage recipe, &ldquoTried and True Chocolate Chip Cookies,&rdquo to thousands in her Utah cooking classes and online at her blog abountifulkitchen.com. The recipe has a heritage story. It was developed after her son, Stephen, and his friend, Spencer, decided in high school to take treats every Sunday to those who needed uplifting.

After some hits and misses with the cookies, Foster developed her recipe that includes special instructions so the cookies turn out every time at both high altitude and sea level. She hears frequently from people who have essentially adopted her cookie-making formula as their own heritage recipe.

Anne Metcalf thanks her proselyting mission to Singapore for her treasured Vietnamese spring roll recipe. When she was on her mission, she wrote her mother, Ngoc Chung Metcalf, a Vietnam native, asking for a copy of her delicious spring roll recipe. Once or twice a year, when Anne was a child, her mother would make a large batch of rolls from scratch by chopping the vegetables and grinding her own pork. Metcalf would help by rolling the delicacies. Her mother always shared the rolls with appreciative neighbors. &ldquoEveryone loved them,&rdquo Metcalf said.

But her mother never worked from a recipe. So, Metcalf asked her to calculate the recipe&rsquos measurements and mail them to her on her mission. She&rsquos grateful she made the request. &ldquoThe recipe is in my mother&rsquos handwriting and seeing the recipe is very special to me because she has passed,&rdquo Metcalf said.

For Thom Reed, it only takes a bite of sweet potato pie to be transported back to his grandmother&rsquos kitchen. Theora Reed grew up in Mississippi and took her Southern cooking skills north to Gary, Indiana, where Thom formed his fond childhood memories of her. Holidays and special occasions meant Grandma Theora&rsquos sweet potato pie.


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