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Cinnamon Rolls

Cinnamon Rolls

From 100 ml of warm milk, fresh yeast, a tablespoon of flour and sugar we prepare a mayonnaise, which we leave to rise in a warm place until it doubles in volume. In a larger bowl we put flour, make a hole in the middle and put the rest milk, melted and cooled butter, eggs, salt and mayonnaise. Knead all the ingredients until we have a homogeneous dough. If the dough is too soft, add a little flour, and if it is too hard you can add warm milk (one tablespoon each ). Knead the dough for about 10 minutes, until it becomes elastic. Put a little oil on top of the dough, then let it rise until it doubles in volume, in a warm place.

For the filling, mix the butter with the sugar and cinnamon, until a paste is formed. After about an hour, turn the dough over on the floured work table and knead a little more to remove the air, then spread the dough in a rectangular sheet about 5 mm thick. Carefully spread the butter and sugar paste and even out. It is good to spread the sugar paste close to the edges. Carefully roll the dough sheet as tightly as we can and press lightly with your fingers to close it at the ends. Using a knife very well sharp, without teeth because the dough crumbles, cut the roll into pieces about 3-4 cm thick. , so that the rolls leaven a little more. Put the rolls in the oven over a moderate heat until they brown nicely on the surface. Be careful, they burn very quickly, that's why they must be watched while they are baking.

For the glaze mix the sugar with water, add teaspoon by teaspoon until a glossy icing results. Remove the rolls from the oven and while they are hot put the icing on top.


Cinnamon Rolls

In a small bowl, dissolve yeast in warm water and set aside. In a large bowl mix milk, 1/4 cup sugar, 1/3 cup melted butter or shortening, salt and the egg. Add two cups of flour and mix until smooth. Add yeast mixture. Mix in remaining flour until dough is easy to handle. Knead dough on lightly floured surface for 5-10 minutes. Place in well-greased bowl and let rise until doubled, usually 1 & # 8211 1 1/2 hours.

When doubled, punch down dough. Roll out on flour surface into a 15 & # 2159 inch rectangle. Spread melted butter all over dough. Mix 3/4 cup sugar and cinnamon and sprinkle over buttered dough. Sprinkle with walnuts, pecans, or raisins if desired. Beginning at 15 inch side role up dough and pinch edge together to seal. Cut into 12-15 slices. Coat bottom of baking pan with butter and sprinkle with sugar. Place cinnamon roll slices close together in the pan and let rise until dough is doubled, about 45 minutes. Bake at 350 ° F for about 25-30 minutes or until nicely browned.

Meanwhile, mix 4 tablespoons butter, powdered sugar and vanilla. Add hot water 1 tablespoon at a time until the glaze reaches desired consistency. Spread over slightly cooled rolls.


Twisty cinnamon buns

Cinnamon buns are perfect & # 8212 they don't need disruption, nobody needs a fresh new take on them, and they don't need refining. I suspect that for most of us, our only grievance is that nobody makes them often enough. Have you ever woken up to the smell of fresh cinnamon buns baking in the oven? Yeah, me neither, but boy does my family have good things to say about it.


So what is this? Well, these are cinnamon rolls with a little update, exactly what I said nobody needs, but it turns out & # 8230 I do. This is the exact recipe, down to the last teaspoon, I use to make cinnamon buns at home, which I & # 8217ve tweaked and tweaked over the last few years until it was exactly the way I wanted it: no separated eggs, easy-to -remember measurements, a plush, rich dough wound with the perfect cinnamon bite. But & # 8212 maybe this has been written about somewhere else, not sure & # 8212 but we & # 8217ve been home a lot over the last year and when I & # 8217m home a lot, I start tinkering. I applied the kind of twisting we use for a babka cake-style krantz and stuffed four of these twists in a pan and let them expand and bronze in semi-chaotic ribbons in the oven and I found three things that these do even better than cinnamon buns.

This is also a frost-your-own-adventure bun. I absolutely believe in frosting icing rolls, especially with cream cheese, but these are too pretty and textured to cover. Instead, I make a big bowl on the side and you can slather exactly the amount you want on your own piece. I & # 8217d start with this:

I think you know exactly what needs to be done this weekend. I can smell the deliciousness from here.

Previously


Twisty Cinnamon Bun Bake

  • Servings: Around 12
  • Time: 2.5 hours plus chilling time
  • Source: Smitten Kitchen
Dough
Filling
Icing

Method 1: Let the dough rise at room temperature until it just shy of doubles, about 1 1/2 to 2 hours (I find that it looks like it & # 8217s not rising at all for the first hour and then boom, it takes off, doubling around 1 1/2 hours.Transfer dough to the fridge to chill for at least 1 hour and up to 2 days.It is impossible to work with this dough when still at room temperature don & # 8217t even try.

Method 2: Let the dough rise in the fridge a minimum of 8 hours, and up to 2 days. It will be just about doubled when it comes out.

Fill and shape dough: Heat oven to 375 degrees F. Melt butter and add a pinch or two of salt if the butter is unsalted. Set aside. Combine brown sugar and cinnamon in a separate bowl. Coat a 9 & # 21513-inch baking pan with butter or nonstick spray. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper.

Roll chilled dough out a very, very well-floured counter, covered with more flour, until it & # 8217s a very wide slab & # 8212 about 30 inches wide and as deep as you can comfortably roll it, about 10 to 12 inches. You & # 8217ll want to lift the dough and re-flour underneath as you roll. Brush evenly with melted butter. Sprinkle evenly with brown sugar-cinnamon mixture and pat it down. Begin rolling, using a scraper as needed where the dough is stuck, from the long end, rolling the dough into an as-tight-as-possible coil. Once in a coil, I stretch it gently until it & # 8217s 34 to 36 inches. Transfer it to the parchment-lined baking sheet, bending it into a horseshoe, and freeze it for 15 minutes. This will firm the log and make it much, much easier to work with.

Remove from the freezer and cut the horseshoe-shaped log crosswise into two equal lengths. Using a serrated knife in a gentle sawing motion, carefully cut the first log in half lengthwise, exposing the layered center. Place halves next to each other, cut side up. Lift one side over the next, forming as many twists as you can down the log (stretching it a little as you twist is fine), and try to keep the cut sides up. Cut this long twist into two equal lengths and arrange across the short side of the baking dish in two rows. Repeat with the second log, splitting, twisting, and dividing, forming two more rows in the baking dish. If you discover, like I often do, that you didn't use all of the melted butter in the filling, brush the rest over the twists now. Let dough rest for 15 minutes at room temperature before baking.

Bake: For 30 to 35 minutes, or until golden all over and have an internal temperature of 190 degrees F.

Make icing: In a medium bowl, beat or whisk cream cheese, powdered sugar, and vanilla until smooth. Add 1 tablespoon milk or cream and beat to combine. If you & # 8217d like a thinner frosting, add the second tablespoon. Place in bowl with spoon for serving.

Serves: When buns come out of oven, let them cool 5 minutes, if you can bear it, before cutting in. Serve in squares of any size (although if you cut the pan into 12, it will be closest to a standard cinnamon bun size) with the frosting on the side.

Do ahead: The buns ostensibly keep at room temperature for a few days, just not around here cover tightly with foil or plastic. Leftover icing goes in the fridge and will last a week.

Note: You can watch an Instagram Story, a TikTok, or a Reel demo of this recipe, too.


Cinnamon Rolls with Cream Cheese Glaze

Combine milk and butter in glass measuring cup. Microwave on high until butter melts and mixture is just warmed to 120 ° F to 130 ° F, 30 to 45 seconds. Pour into bowl of stand mixer fitted with paddle attachment. Add 1 cup flour, sugar, egg, yeast, and salt. Beat on low speed 3 minutes, stopping occasionally to scrape down sides of bowl. Add 2 1/2 cups flour. Beat on low until flour is absorbed and dough is sticky, scraping down sides of bowl. If dough is very sticky, add more flour by tablespoonfuls until dough begins to form ball and pulls away from sides of bowl. Turn dough out onto lightly floured work surface. Knead until smooth and elastic, adding more flour if sticky, about 8 minutes. Form into ball.

Step 2

Lightly oil large bowl with nonstick spray. Transfer dough to bowl, turning to coat. Cover bowl with plastic wrap, then kitchen towel. Let dough rise in warm draft-free area until doubled in volume, about 2 hours.

FILLING

Step 3

Mix brown sugar and cinnamon in medium bowl.

Step 4

Punch down dough. Transfer to floured work surface. Roll out to 15x11-inch rectangle. Spread butter over dough, leaving 1/2-inch border. Sprinkle cinnamon sugar evenly over butter. Starting at 1 long side, roll dough into log, pinching gently to keep it rolled up. With seam side down, cut dough crosswise with thin sharp knife into 18 equal slices (each about 1/2 to 3/4 inch wide).

Step 5

Spray two 9-inch square glass baking dishes with nonstick spray. Divide rolls between baking dishes, arranging cut side up (there will be almost no space between rolls). Cover baking dishes with plastic wrap, then kitchen towel. Let dough rise in warm draft-free area until almost doubled in volume, 40 to 45 minutes.

Step 6

Position rack in center of oven and preheat to 375 ° F. Bake rolls until tops are golden, about 20 minutes. Remove from oven and invert immediately onto rack. Cool 10 minutes. Turn rolls right side up.

GLAZE

Step 7

Combine cream cheese, powdered sugar, butter, and vanilla in medium bowl. Using electric mixer, beat until smooth. Spread glaze on rolls. Serve warm or at room temperature.

How would you rate Cinnamon Rolls with Cream Cheese Glaze?

One normal helping of yeast is 2 1/4 tsp, so I used 4 1/2 tsp. I think the recipe needs more salt, like 1 1/2 tsp or maybe even use salted butter for the milk-butter step. Or to spread the filing. They can be light and fluffy but taste a little bland. I’m sure there are other ways to improve the flavor of the dough. The directions don’t explain rolling the “long way” - doing it yet “short way” makes a lot of layers to the spiral, but fewer rolls. They turn out better with fewer spiral layers. You want it like a hotdog, not like a hamburger. A long, tight hotdog is better than burrito with too much stuff in the middle and nothing on the outside. I roll with a rolling pin and get the dough to about 1/4 in thick before rolling. I think they end up a good size once they bake. When I roll, I gently guide the dough forward with both hands gently and then press down, moving right to left. After rolling a few inches, I swipe right to left to make sure the cinnamon spreads around. The worst is when you have pockets of no filling. I use a chef knife to cut my cross sections. I use my hands to flip them and then gently cup them in the palm of my hands like they are little flower buds. It looks a lot better when you make them round. Better when not smooshed. They won’t puff into perfect spirals if they are smooshed. The less you disturb the spiral the better. I think they’re better if you bake them on a cookie sheet. The lower sides of the pan allow the outer layer of the cinnamon roll brown. I bake for about 40 mins or more at 350. Flip them over to dry so that the cinnamon gooey stuff runs to the top. If it runs to the bottom, you get a tough candy later that ruins teeth. I skip the frosting.

These turned out really well! Just used one packet of yeast (which is already 2 1/4 tsp) and though the dough didn’t double in size, the rolls ended up being fine. Also wanted to make these ahead, so instead of doing the second rise in step 5, I wrapped them in plastic wrap and kept them in the fridge overnight. Proceeded with the recipe after letting them sit at room temperature for about 30 minutes. Would make again!

I & # x27m confused by the 2 1/4 teaspoons yeast from 2 packets. That is how much yeast is in one packet. Not sure if I read something wrong, but these did not rise.

I have a question. I’d love to make these for the morning but it’s a lot to do. Any recommendations on how I can prep these the day before?

Am I the only one having trouble with the rise? The yeast isn & # x27t expired but damn this thing just wonâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s puff up

the best dessert I’ve made to date!

The dough was the best I’ve ever tried. It also holds up well and can be reheated the next day!

epic cinnamon rolls, epic test kitchen

LOVE this recipe! I & # x27ve made it several times for guests and everyone is stunned every time. I recommend this recipe to everyone!

Such a GOOD recipe. This recipe was simple and straightforward. Easy enough for me & my seven year old to make - actually he pretty much did everything. The waiting part was definitely the hardest but, super fun to watch the dough grow. We cooked our rolls a little longer than the recipe called for, otherwise it would have been underdone. We could skip the glaze next time if we are feeling lazy as it was super rich & amp over the top. Overall a hit, thanks.


Oddly enough, this is a one-pot recipe

Although there are some mixing bowls needed for the icing, the dough is actually made in a single pot on the stove. This made for a pretty easy start, even if it seemed strange to me.

I made the dough on the stove as directed, then moved it to a mixing bowl to proof. It rose so well that I had a hard time getting it to stop rising.

The rising dough overflowed out of my mixing bowl, and it was very difficult to roll out because it was so fluffy and sticky.

I wrangled it as best as I could and packed my dough strips with filling before getting them into the baking pans to rise more.

Although they seemed far apart in the pan, I knew they'd rise even more once they started baking.


You can recreate classic Cinnabon-style cinnamon rolls at home

Want to make your own Cinnabon-style cinnamon rolls at home? Just a Pinch has you covered with their copycat Cinnabon cinnamon rolls recipe. It will make 12 regular sized cinnamon rolls or 24 mini ones, and takes about six hours in total to complete, including the time you’ll have to wait for the dough to rise - as cinnamon roll dough is prepared using yeast.

If you're looking for a recipe made without margarine or are a little short on time, check out this Taste of Home recipe which they say perfectly replicates Cinnabon's classic treat. The outlet replaces the margarine used in both Cinnabon and Just a Pinch's versions with plain old butter, and also calls for a much shorter amount of resting time to allow the dough to rise, stating that their dough should be doubled in size after only one hour. This recipe creates 16 cinnamon rolls.


Recipe Summary

  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted, plus more, room-temperature, for bowl and dish
  • 1 medium russet potato (8 ounces), peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces (1 1/4 cups)
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 2 1/4 teaspoons active dry yeast (not rapid-rise one whole 1/4-ounce envelope)
  • 2/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 3 1/2 cups bread flour, plus more for dusting
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 2/3 cup packed light-brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • Large pinch kosher salt
  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 4 ounces cream cheese, room temperature
  • 1/2 cup confectioners' sugar
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons whole milk
  • 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • Pinch kosher salt

Dough: Brush a large bowl with butter set aside. Place potato in a small pot of water and bring to a boil. Cook until fork-tender, 10 to 12 minutes drain. Pass through a ricer or mash with a fork until smooth (to yield 2/3 cup) let cool slightly.

Heat milk until warm to the touch (110 degrees on a thermometer). Transfer to the bowl of a stand mixer add yeast. Let stand until foamy, about 5 minutes. Stir in butter, granulated sugar, potato, egg, flour, and salt until a ragged dough forms. Place bowl on mixer fitted with the dough-hook attachment mix on medium-low speed, scraping sides and removing dough from hook a few times, until soft and pliable, about 15 minutes. Transfer to a lightly floured surface knead into a ball. Transfer to buttered bowl (dough will be very soft) and cover with plastic wrap. (Dough can be covered and refrigerated at this point up to 2 days). Let rise in a warm place until almost doubled, 1 hour and 10 minutes to 1 1/2 hours. Brush a 9-by-13-inch glass baking dish with butter set aside.

Filling: In a medium bowl, stir together brown sugar, cinnamon, and salt. Punch down dough transfer to a lightly floured surface. Roll out to a 14-by-18-inch rectangle. Spread evenly with butter, leaving a 1/2-inch border on far long edge top with brown-sugar mixture. Starting at long edge closest to you, roll dough away from you into a tight jelly-roll shape. Transfer, seam-side down, to a parchment-lined baking sheet and refrigerate until firm, about 30 minutes. Trim ends, then cut roll crosswise into twelve 1 1/2-inch-thick rounds with a serrated knife. Arrange, cut-sides up, in prepared dish cover with plastic wrap. Refrigerate at least 8 hours, or overnight.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Remove rolls from refrigerator and place in a warm spot until almost doubled in size, about 1 1/2 hours. Remove plastic and bake until browned on top and a thermometer inserted registers about 210 degrees, 30 to 35 minutes. Let cool in dish on a wire rack, 10 minutes.

Glaze: Meanwhile, whisk together cream cheese, confectioners' sugar, milk, vanilla, and salt. Spread rolls with glaze let cool 15 to 20 minutes more before serving.


The Shortcut Cook: Classic Recipes and the Ingenious Hacks That Make Them Faster, Simpler and Tastier

I know what you’re thinking: Suspect! Fraudulent! No way they’re good! I, too, thought that yeast-free cinnamon rolls were some sort of oxymoron, but I was pleasantly surprised as I bit into the soft, pillowy, flawlessly sweet wheels, topped with tangy buttermilk glaze. Not only were these cinnamon rolls quick and easy, they were also truly delicious. As I reached for a second helping, I found myself wondering why I’d never stumbled upon the not-so-secret concept of no-yeast cinnamon rolls.

“I kept the classic flavor, combining all the good stuff: warming cinnamon, a hint of mixed spice, and a buttermilk glaze with its hint of acidity,” Reynolds told me over email. "The texture is light but dense enough to satisfy."

"I loved the idea of ​​making a delicious cinnamon bun from scratch that would be ready in the time it would take to make a simple cake or biscuit."

While writing The Shortcut Cook, Reynolds knew she wanted to develop a cinnamon bun recipe that skipped the process of making a yeasted dough, which usually requires a lot of kneading, proofing, waiting, and shaping. “I loved the idea of ​​making a delicious cinnamon bun from scratch that would be ready in the time it would take to make a simple cake or biscuit,” she says.

And though this recipe completely skips the yeast in favor of a mix of baking powder and baking soda, Reynolds explains that you shouldn’t entirely skip the kneading. Her initial version of the recipe started with a dough that was similar to a scone dough, but she says that it didn’t hold its swirl shape well. "I knew I needed to develop the gluten in the flour more, so I kneaded the dough until it became smooth, which gave the characteristic tighter crumb similar to a yeasted bun."

Get started by mixing the glaze first: Combine melted butter, powdered sugar, vanilla extract (or vanilla paste), hot water, and buttermilk in a small bowl and set it in the fridge while you prep and bake the buns. Next, make the cinnamon filling by combining more melted butter with cinnamon, mixed spice, salt, and sugar until the mixture resembles wet sand.

You’ll need to knead the simple shaggy dough — enriched with melted butter and tangy buttermilk — for just three minutes until it’s smooth, elastic, and slightly shiny. Then use your hands to pat the dough into a large rectangle — no rolling pin required! Sprinkle the filling in an even layer on top, roll up the dough, and cut it into a dozen equal pieces. Instead of crowding them into a high-sided pan, you’ll spread them apart on a cookie sheet, which helps your rolls cook faster and achieve all-around browning.

If you’re anything like me, these cinnamon rolls just might be among the first you’ve seen on the internet, saved, and actually made. But here’s the real pro move: Bake them tonight for dessert, and you can reheat the leftovers in the oven (or toaster oven) for an even quicker breakfast tomorrow morning.


Recipe Summary

  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted, plus more, room-temperature, for bowl and dish
  • 1 medium russet potato (8 ounces), peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces (1 1/4 cups)
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 2 1/4 teaspoons active dry yeast (not rapid-rise one whole 1/4-ounce envelope)
  • 2/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 3 1/2 cups bread flour, plus more for dusting
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 2/3 cup packed light-brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • Large pinch kosher salt
  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 4 ounces cream cheese, room temperature
  • 1/2 cup confectioners' sugar
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons whole milk
  • 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • Pinch kosher salt

Dough: Brush a large bowl with butter set aside. Place potato in a small pot of water and bring to a boil. Cook until fork-tender, 10 to 12 minutes drain. Pass through a ricer or mash with a fork until smooth (to yield 2/3 cup) let cool slightly.

Heat milk until warm to the touch (110 degrees on a thermometer). Transfer to the bowl of a stand mixer add yeast. Let stand until foamy, about 5 minutes. Stir in butter, granulated sugar, potato, egg, flour, and salt until a ragged dough forms. Place bowl on mixer fitted with the dough-hook attachment mix on medium-low speed, scraping sides and removing dough from hook a few times, until soft and pliable, about 15 minutes. Transfer to a lightly floured surface knead into a ball. Transfer to buttered bowl (dough will be very soft) and cover with plastic wrap. (Dough can be covered and refrigerated at this point up to 2 days). Let rise in a warm place until almost doubled, 1 hour and 10 minutes to 1 1/2 hours. Brush a 9-by-13-inch glass baking dish with butter set aside.

Filling: In a medium bowl, stir together brown sugar, cinnamon, and salt. Punch down dough transfer to a lightly floured surface. Roll out to a 14-by-18-inch rectangle. Spread evenly with butter, leaving a 1/2-inch border on far long edge top with brown-sugar mixture. Starting at long edge closest to you, roll dough away from you into a tight jelly-roll shape. Transfer, seam-side down, to a parchment-lined baking sheet and refrigerate until firm, about 30 minutes. Trim ends, then cut roll crosswise into twelve 1 1/2-inch-thick rounds with a serrated knife. Arrange, cut-sides up, in prepared dish cover with plastic wrap. Refrigerate at least 8 hours, or overnight.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Remove rolls from refrigerator and place in a warm spot until almost doubled in size, about 1 1/2 hours. Remove plastic and bake until browned on top and a thermometer inserted registers about 210 degrees, 30 to 35 minutes. Let cool in dish on a wire rack, 10 minutes.

Glaze: Meanwhile, whisk together cream cheese, confectioners' sugar, milk, vanilla, and salt. Spread rolls with glaze let cool 15 to 20 minutes more before serving.


Oddly enough, this is a one-pot recipe

Although there are some mixing bowls needed for the icing, the dough is actually made in a single pot on the stove. This made for a pretty easy start, even if it seemed strange to me.

I made the dough on the stove as directed, then moved it to a mixing bowl to proof. It rose so well that I had a hard time getting it to stop rising.

The rising dough overflowed out of my mixing bowl, and it was very difficult to roll out because it was so fluffy and sticky.

I wrangled it as best as I could and packed my dough strips with filling before getting them into the baking pans to rise more.

Although they seemed far apart in the pan, I knew they'd rise even more once they started baking.


Recipe Summary

  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted, plus more, room-temperature, for bowl and dish
  • 1 medium russet potato (8 ounces), peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces (1 1/4 cups)
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 2 1/4 teaspoons active dry yeast (not rapid-rise one whole 1/4-ounce envelope)
  • 2/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 3 1/2 cups bread flour, plus more for dusting
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 2/3 cup packed light-brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • Large pinch kosher salt
  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 4 ounces cream cheese, room temperature
  • 1/2 cup confectioners' sugar
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons whole milk
  • 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • Pinch kosher salt

Dough: Brush a large bowl with butter set aside. Place potato in a small pot of water and bring to a boil. Cook until fork-tender, 10 to 12 minutes drain. Pass through a ricer or mash with a fork until smooth (to yield 2/3 cup) let cool slightly.

Heat milk until warm to the touch (110 degrees on a thermometer). Transfer to the bowl of a stand mixer add yeast. Let stand until foamy, about 5 minutes. Stir in butter, granulated sugar, potato, egg, flour, and salt until a ragged dough forms. Place bowl on mixer fitted with the dough-hook attachment mix on medium-low speed, scraping sides and removing dough from hook a few times, until soft and pliable, about 15 minutes. Transfer to a lightly floured surface knead into a ball. Transfer to buttered bowl (dough will be very soft) and cover with plastic wrap. (Dough can be covered and refrigerated at this point up to 2 days). Let rise in a warm place until almost doubled, 1 hour and 10 minutes to 1 1/2 hours. Brush a 9-by-13-inch glass baking dish with butter set aside.

Filling: In a medium bowl, stir together brown sugar, cinnamon, and salt. Punch down dough transfer to a lightly floured surface. Roll out to a 14-by-18-inch rectangle. Spread evenly with butter, leaving a 1/2-inch border on far long edge top with brown-sugar mixture. Starting at long edge closest to you, roll dough away from you into a tight jelly-roll shape. Transfer, seam-side down, to a parchment-lined baking sheet and refrigerate until firm, about 30 minutes. Trim ends, then cut roll crosswise into twelve 1 1/2-inch-thick rounds with a serrated knife. Arrange, cut-sides up, in prepared dish cover with plastic wrap. Refrigerate at least 8 hours, or overnight.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Remove rolls from refrigerator and place in a warm spot until almost doubled in size, about 1 1/2 hours. Remove plastic and bake until browned on top and a thermometer inserted registers about 210 degrees, 30 to 35 minutes. Let cool in dish on a wire rack, 10 minutes.

Glaze: Meanwhile, whisk together cream cheese, confectioners' sugar, milk, vanilla, and salt. Spread rolls with glaze let cool 15 to 20 minutes more before serving.


Video: How To Make Homemade Cinnamon Rolls Tasty (December 2021).