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Quinoa Salad with Roasted Beets and Pear

Quinoa Salad with Roasted Beets and Pear

I don’t think I’d had a beet before that moment, and that bunch completely changed the game. Just a dark internal spiral of serious beet addiction. I roasted them and shredded them and stained all of my clothing cutting them. I brought big tupperwares to work for lunch full of raw beet cubes and would sit in Bryant Park, crunching. It was totally weird. I went back to college that fall having morphed into a big ol’ human-sized beet.

Turns out you can have too much of a good thing, so I had to learn to cool it on the beets. Now I am an adult, or something, so I’m much better at moderation. I am learning to balance out my root vegetable intake with pears and walnuts and quinoa. And cheese. Goodness gracious. I guess what I’m saying is, keep an eye on me. This is an awesome salad and you should make it right this second. But if next week’s Hangry is about beets again, and so is the week after that…send help.

Servings: 2

Ingredients:

2 cups cooked quinoa (I prefer red, so the beets don’t bleed)
2 medium-sized beets, scrubbed
1/4 cup walnuts
1 large pear, cubed
3 ounces crumbled feta
Olive oil
Balsamic vinegar
Salt and pepper

This post was written by Kendra Vaculin, an old Spoon writer at Northwestern! Thanks to Food52 for being a proud Spoon content partner.

The post Quinoa Salad with Roasted Beets and Pear appeared first on Spoon University.


Beet and Quinoa Salad with Maple-Balsamic Reduction

I’m not sure when beet season is, but recently I was able to find three different types of beets in the local grocery stores: “regular” red beets, golden beets, and lovely chioggia beets. Faced with such a surplus of riches, I did what any beet lover would do–I bought them all. Then I brought them home and roasted them.

If you don’t like beets, try roasting them. Roasting brings out their sweetness and minimizes their “earthy” flavor. Combining them with something sweet, like oranges slices, and something tangy, like vinegar, also enhances beets’ flavor.

And why would you want to eat them if you don’t like them? Because just as they are saturated with color, they are saturated with nutrients. They are an excellent source of folate and a very good source of manganese, potassium, and copper. According to whfoods.com, “These colorful root vegetables contain powerful nutrient compounds that help protect against heart disease, birth defects and certain cancers, especially colon cancer.”

Roasted beets are a great addition to any salad–just slice or chop them and add them to any green salad. But I had a craving for quinoa, and I could just imagine the slightly grassy flavor of the quinoa and the sweet earthiness of the beets. To accentuate the sweetness, I added slices of clementines to add protein and make this a main dish salad, I included my favorite legumes, chickpeas. And I tossed it all with the simplest of dressings, a reduction made from white balsamic vinegar and and a touch of maple syrup.

I’m usually someone who loves strong, spicy flavors, so I didn’t expect to be wowed by this simple combination, but I could not get enough of it. I even made a second batch that I’ve been eating for breakfast. If you love beets, this is a “must try” and if you don’t like beets, how about giving them another chance?


Beet and Quinoa Salad with Maple-Balsamic Reduction

I’m not sure when beet season is, but recently I was able to find three different types of beets in the local grocery stores: “regular” red beets, golden beets, and lovely chioggia beets. Faced with such a surplus of riches, I did what any beet lover would do–I bought them all. Then I brought them home and roasted them.

If you don’t like beets, try roasting them. Roasting brings out their sweetness and minimizes their “earthy” flavor. Combining them with something sweet, like oranges slices, and something tangy, like vinegar, also enhances beets’ flavor.

And why would you want to eat them if you don’t like them? Because just as they are saturated with color, they are saturated with nutrients. They are an excellent source of folate and a very good source of manganese, potassium, and copper. According to whfoods.com, “These colorful root vegetables contain powerful nutrient compounds that help protect against heart disease, birth defects and certain cancers, especially colon cancer.”

Roasted beets are a great addition to any salad–just slice or chop them and add them to any green salad. But I had a craving for quinoa, and I could just imagine the slightly grassy flavor of the quinoa and the sweet earthiness of the beets. To accentuate the sweetness, I added slices of clementines to add protein and make this a main dish salad, I included my favorite legumes, chickpeas. And I tossed it all with the simplest of dressings, a reduction made from white balsamic vinegar and and a touch of maple syrup.

I’m usually someone who loves strong, spicy flavors, so I didn’t expect to be wowed by this simple combination, but I could not get enough of it. I even made a second batch that I’ve been eating for breakfast. If you love beets, this is a “must try” and if you don’t like beets, how about giving them another chance?


Beet and Quinoa Salad with Maple-Balsamic Reduction

I’m not sure when beet season is, but recently I was able to find three different types of beets in the local grocery stores: “regular” red beets, golden beets, and lovely chioggia beets. Faced with such a surplus of riches, I did what any beet lover would do–I bought them all. Then I brought them home and roasted them.

If you don’t like beets, try roasting them. Roasting brings out their sweetness and minimizes their “earthy” flavor. Combining them with something sweet, like oranges slices, and something tangy, like vinegar, also enhances beets’ flavor.

And why would you want to eat them if you don’t like them? Because just as they are saturated with color, they are saturated with nutrients. They are an excellent source of folate and a very good source of manganese, potassium, and copper. According to whfoods.com, “These colorful root vegetables contain powerful nutrient compounds that help protect against heart disease, birth defects and certain cancers, especially colon cancer.”

Roasted beets are a great addition to any salad–just slice or chop them and add them to any green salad. But I had a craving for quinoa, and I could just imagine the slightly grassy flavor of the quinoa and the sweet earthiness of the beets. To accentuate the sweetness, I added slices of clementines to add protein and make this a main dish salad, I included my favorite legumes, chickpeas. And I tossed it all with the simplest of dressings, a reduction made from white balsamic vinegar and and a touch of maple syrup.

I’m usually someone who loves strong, spicy flavors, so I didn’t expect to be wowed by this simple combination, but I could not get enough of it. I even made a second batch that I’ve been eating for breakfast. If you love beets, this is a “must try” and if you don’t like beets, how about giving them another chance?


Beet and Quinoa Salad with Maple-Balsamic Reduction

I’m not sure when beet season is, but recently I was able to find three different types of beets in the local grocery stores: “regular” red beets, golden beets, and lovely chioggia beets. Faced with such a surplus of riches, I did what any beet lover would do–I bought them all. Then I brought them home and roasted them.

If you don’t like beets, try roasting them. Roasting brings out their sweetness and minimizes their “earthy” flavor. Combining them with something sweet, like oranges slices, and something tangy, like vinegar, also enhances beets’ flavor.

And why would you want to eat them if you don’t like them? Because just as they are saturated with color, they are saturated with nutrients. They are an excellent source of folate and a very good source of manganese, potassium, and copper. According to whfoods.com, “These colorful root vegetables contain powerful nutrient compounds that help protect against heart disease, birth defects and certain cancers, especially colon cancer.”

Roasted beets are a great addition to any salad–just slice or chop them and add them to any green salad. But I had a craving for quinoa, and I could just imagine the slightly grassy flavor of the quinoa and the sweet earthiness of the beets. To accentuate the sweetness, I added slices of clementines to add protein and make this a main dish salad, I included my favorite legumes, chickpeas. And I tossed it all with the simplest of dressings, a reduction made from white balsamic vinegar and and a touch of maple syrup.

I’m usually someone who loves strong, spicy flavors, so I didn’t expect to be wowed by this simple combination, but I could not get enough of it. I even made a second batch that I’ve been eating for breakfast. If you love beets, this is a “must try” and if you don’t like beets, how about giving them another chance?


Beet and Quinoa Salad with Maple-Balsamic Reduction

I’m not sure when beet season is, but recently I was able to find three different types of beets in the local grocery stores: “regular” red beets, golden beets, and lovely chioggia beets. Faced with such a surplus of riches, I did what any beet lover would do–I bought them all. Then I brought them home and roasted them.

If you don’t like beets, try roasting them. Roasting brings out their sweetness and minimizes their “earthy” flavor. Combining them with something sweet, like oranges slices, and something tangy, like vinegar, also enhances beets’ flavor.

And why would you want to eat them if you don’t like them? Because just as they are saturated with color, they are saturated with nutrients. They are an excellent source of folate and a very good source of manganese, potassium, and copper. According to whfoods.com, “These colorful root vegetables contain powerful nutrient compounds that help protect against heart disease, birth defects and certain cancers, especially colon cancer.”

Roasted beets are a great addition to any salad–just slice or chop them and add them to any green salad. But I had a craving for quinoa, and I could just imagine the slightly grassy flavor of the quinoa and the sweet earthiness of the beets. To accentuate the sweetness, I added slices of clementines to add protein and make this a main dish salad, I included my favorite legumes, chickpeas. And I tossed it all with the simplest of dressings, a reduction made from white balsamic vinegar and and a touch of maple syrup.

I’m usually someone who loves strong, spicy flavors, so I didn’t expect to be wowed by this simple combination, but I could not get enough of it. I even made a second batch that I’ve been eating for breakfast. If you love beets, this is a “must try” and if you don’t like beets, how about giving them another chance?


Beet and Quinoa Salad with Maple-Balsamic Reduction

I’m not sure when beet season is, but recently I was able to find three different types of beets in the local grocery stores: “regular” red beets, golden beets, and lovely chioggia beets. Faced with such a surplus of riches, I did what any beet lover would do–I bought them all. Then I brought them home and roasted them.

If you don’t like beets, try roasting them. Roasting brings out their sweetness and minimizes their “earthy” flavor. Combining them with something sweet, like oranges slices, and something tangy, like vinegar, also enhances beets’ flavor.

And why would you want to eat them if you don’t like them? Because just as they are saturated with color, they are saturated with nutrients. They are an excellent source of folate and a very good source of manganese, potassium, and copper. According to whfoods.com, “These colorful root vegetables contain powerful nutrient compounds that help protect against heart disease, birth defects and certain cancers, especially colon cancer.”

Roasted beets are a great addition to any salad–just slice or chop them and add them to any green salad. But I had a craving for quinoa, and I could just imagine the slightly grassy flavor of the quinoa and the sweet earthiness of the beets. To accentuate the sweetness, I added slices of clementines to add protein and make this a main dish salad, I included my favorite legumes, chickpeas. And I tossed it all with the simplest of dressings, a reduction made from white balsamic vinegar and and a touch of maple syrup.

I’m usually someone who loves strong, spicy flavors, so I didn’t expect to be wowed by this simple combination, but I could not get enough of it. I even made a second batch that I’ve been eating for breakfast. If you love beets, this is a “must try” and if you don’t like beets, how about giving them another chance?


Beet and Quinoa Salad with Maple-Balsamic Reduction

I’m not sure when beet season is, but recently I was able to find three different types of beets in the local grocery stores: “regular” red beets, golden beets, and lovely chioggia beets. Faced with such a surplus of riches, I did what any beet lover would do–I bought them all. Then I brought them home and roasted them.

If you don’t like beets, try roasting them. Roasting brings out their sweetness and minimizes their “earthy” flavor. Combining them with something sweet, like oranges slices, and something tangy, like vinegar, also enhances beets’ flavor.

And why would you want to eat them if you don’t like them? Because just as they are saturated with color, they are saturated with nutrients. They are an excellent source of folate and a very good source of manganese, potassium, and copper. According to whfoods.com, “These colorful root vegetables contain powerful nutrient compounds that help protect against heart disease, birth defects and certain cancers, especially colon cancer.”

Roasted beets are a great addition to any salad–just slice or chop them and add them to any green salad. But I had a craving for quinoa, and I could just imagine the slightly grassy flavor of the quinoa and the sweet earthiness of the beets. To accentuate the sweetness, I added slices of clementines to add protein and make this a main dish salad, I included my favorite legumes, chickpeas. And I tossed it all with the simplest of dressings, a reduction made from white balsamic vinegar and and a touch of maple syrup.

I’m usually someone who loves strong, spicy flavors, so I didn’t expect to be wowed by this simple combination, but I could not get enough of it. I even made a second batch that I’ve been eating for breakfast. If you love beets, this is a “must try” and if you don’t like beets, how about giving them another chance?


Beet and Quinoa Salad with Maple-Balsamic Reduction

I’m not sure when beet season is, but recently I was able to find three different types of beets in the local grocery stores: “regular” red beets, golden beets, and lovely chioggia beets. Faced with such a surplus of riches, I did what any beet lover would do–I bought them all. Then I brought them home and roasted them.

If you don’t like beets, try roasting them. Roasting brings out their sweetness and minimizes their “earthy” flavor. Combining them with something sweet, like oranges slices, and something tangy, like vinegar, also enhances beets’ flavor.

And why would you want to eat them if you don’t like them? Because just as they are saturated with color, they are saturated with nutrients. They are an excellent source of folate and a very good source of manganese, potassium, and copper. According to whfoods.com, “These colorful root vegetables contain powerful nutrient compounds that help protect against heart disease, birth defects and certain cancers, especially colon cancer.”

Roasted beets are a great addition to any salad–just slice or chop them and add them to any green salad. But I had a craving for quinoa, and I could just imagine the slightly grassy flavor of the quinoa and the sweet earthiness of the beets. To accentuate the sweetness, I added slices of clementines to add protein and make this a main dish salad, I included my favorite legumes, chickpeas. And I tossed it all with the simplest of dressings, a reduction made from white balsamic vinegar and and a touch of maple syrup.

I’m usually someone who loves strong, spicy flavors, so I didn’t expect to be wowed by this simple combination, but I could not get enough of it. I even made a second batch that I’ve been eating for breakfast. If you love beets, this is a “must try” and if you don’t like beets, how about giving them another chance?


Beet and Quinoa Salad with Maple-Balsamic Reduction

I’m not sure when beet season is, but recently I was able to find three different types of beets in the local grocery stores: “regular” red beets, golden beets, and lovely chioggia beets. Faced with such a surplus of riches, I did what any beet lover would do–I bought them all. Then I brought them home and roasted them.

If you don’t like beets, try roasting them. Roasting brings out their sweetness and minimizes their “earthy” flavor. Combining them with something sweet, like oranges slices, and something tangy, like vinegar, also enhances beets’ flavor.

And why would you want to eat them if you don’t like them? Because just as they are saturated with color, they are saturated with nutrients. They are an excellent source of folate and a very good source of manganese, potassium, and copper. According to whfoods.com, “These colorful root vegetables contain powerful nutrient compounds that help protect against heart disease, birth defects and certain cancers, especially colon cancer.”

Roasted beets are a great addition to any salad–just slice or chop them and add them to any green salad. But I had a craving for quinoa, and I could just imagine the slightly grassy flavor of the quinoa and the sweet earthiness of the beets. To accentuate the sweetness, I added slices of clementines to add protein and make this a main dish salad, I included my favorite legumes, chickpeas. And I tossed it all with the simplest of dressings, a reduction made from white balsamic vinegar and and a touch of maple syrup.

I’m usually someone who loves strong, spicy flavors, so I didn’t expect to be wowed by this simple combination, but I could not get enough of it. I even made a second batch that I’ve been eating for breakfast. If you love beets, this is a “must try” and if you don’t like beets, how about giving them another chance?


Beet and Quinoa Salad with Maple-Balsamic Reduction

I’m not sure when beet season is, but recently I was able to find three different types of beets in the local grocery stores: “regular” red beets, golden beets, and lovely chioggia beets. Faced with such a surplus of riches, I did what any beet lover would do–I bought them all. Then I brought them home and roasted them.

If you don’t like beets, try roasting them. Roasting brings out their sweetness and minimizes their “earthy” flavor. Combining them with something sweet, like oranges slices, and something tangy, like vinegar, also enhances beets’ flavor.

And why would you want to eat them if you don’t like them? Because just as they are saturated with color, they are saturated with nutrients. They are an excellent source of folate and a very good source of manganese, potassium, and copper. According to whfoods.com, “These colorful root vegetables contain powerful nutrient compounds that help protect against heart disease, birth defects and certain cancers, especially colon cancer.”

Roasted beets are a great addition to any salad–just slice or chop them and add them to any green salad. But I had a craving for quinoa, and I could just imagine the slightly grassy flavor of the quinoa and the sweet earthiness of the beets. To accentuate the sweetness, I added slices of clementines to add protein and make this a main dish salad, I included my favorite legumes, chickpeas. And I tossed it all with the simplest of dressings, a reduction made from white balsamic vinegar and and a touch of maple syrup.

I’m usually someone who loves strong, spicy flavors, so I didn’t expect to be wowed by this simple combination, but I could not get enough of it. I even made a second batch that I’ve been eating for breakfast. If you love beets, this is a “must try” and if you don’t like beets, how about giving them another chance?