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Hogmanay Steak Pie recipe

Hogmanay Steak Pie recipe

  • Recipes
  • Ingredients
  • Meat and poultry
  • Beef
  • Cuts of beef
  • Steak
  • Rump steak

We eat this steak pie every Hogmanay night and New Year's Day. We always need to plan to make enough for seconds when we have guests round for dinner! If you don't have the time to cook it for so long and leave overnight you can easily make the recipe in one go in an hour and a half


Argyll, Scotland, UK

435 people made this

IngredientsServes: 6

  • 6 rump steaks
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 onion
  • 2 glasses red wine
  • 1 litre beef stock
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 500g puff pastry

MethodPrep:20min ›Cook:3hr ›Extra time:1hr cooling › Ready in:4hr20min

  1. Heat oven to 120 C / Gas 1/2 and warm a pie dish.
  2. Cut rump steaks into cubes and season with salt and pepper.
  3. Heat olive oil in pan to high and quickly brown the steak cubes in batches, placing in pie dish once browned.
  4. Chop onion into pieces and mix with steak in the pie dish.
  5. Add the wine to the pot you browned the steak in and reduce by half, scraping all the steak bits and juices from the bottom of the pot. Add beef stock to the wine, mix and heat through
  6. Add the stock and wine to the beef in the pie dish, cover tightly with foil and place in the oven for 2 hours, checking and stirring occasionally.
  7. Allow to cool, then refrigerate overnight to let the meat soak in the juices from the gravy.
  8. The next morning heat oven to 200 C / Gas 6. Remove foil from pie dish and place in oven for 30 minutes. Add more stock if gravy is too thick or cornflour mixed first with cold water if it's not thick enough for you.
  9. Roll out puff pastry and cover pie dish, brush with egg yolk.
  10. Return to oven and cook for a further 20 minutes or until pastry is as brown as you like it.

To serve

Serve with green beans or soaked marrowfat peas and mashed potatoes.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(15)

Reviews in English (16)

My mam always made a huge steak pie on new years eve and it was eaten straight after 12o/c that was when I was a wee laddy in the middle 50s. As Im now nearing sixty and mam has long gone and seeing your recipe I might just make myself a big steak pie with a ruff puff topping, thanks for reminding me.-21 Jan 2013

What a cracker,loved this steak pie and will be slaving over the oven tonight.The family cant get enough of it.-31 Dec 2011


Cooking with Joey

If you're not familiar with Hogmanay, it's a Scottish word for the last day of the year and it's basically the celebration of New Year's Eve. It's usually the beginning of a celebration that can last for days! It is believed the Scots inherited the celebration of Hogmanay from the Vikings and their celebration of the shortest day but many believe that as Christmas was virtually banned and not celebrated in Scotland from the end of the 17th century until the 1950’s, New Years Eve was a good excuse for some revelry and the excuse to drink whisky and eat good food. Hogmanay involves parties and festivals across Scotland with the largest and most famous public party in Edinburgh.
How's that for a bit of history. Anyway, being a Scot herself, Claire was the first to bring Hogmanay to my attention and she asked me if I would make her a traditional steak pie to celebrate the beginning of the new year. Sounds good to me!! So, I looked up several recipes, and as is often the case, I decided to take what I like from a few different recipes and make them into one.
And here we are! This is my version of a traditional Scottish Steak Pie. It's warm and comforting and savory and delicious! Serve it up with some mashed potatoes and turnips (tatties and neeps!) and you're ready to go. Even if it's not the last day of the year, I highly recommend making it! As the Scots would say "Lang may yer lum reek", which means "Long may your chimney smoke!"
Happy Hogmanay!

2 lbs beef cubes
1 medium onion, roughly chopped
4 or 5 ribs of celery, roughly chopped
1 lb button mushrooms, sliced
Big pinch dried thyme
Big pinch dried rosemary
2 or 3 bay leaves
1/4 cup flour
2 cups beef broth
1 cup red wine
salt
lots and lots of black pepper
Frozen puff pastry
1 egg


Heat oven to 325F.
In a heavy pot or Dutch oven, add a few tbs oil or butter. Pat the beef cubes with paper towels to make sure they're dry, then add them to the pot in one layer. Do this is batches if you need to. Resist the urge to stir them about. Just let them sit and brown. Turn them over and do the same thing on the other side. Remove them from the pot and set aside in a bowl.
Add the celery and onions to the pot. Let them saute until they begin to soften. Add the mushrooms, thyme, rosemary, and bay leaves, and continue to cook for a few minutes. Add flour. Cook and stir for a few minutes longer. Add broth, wine, salt and pepper. Add the beef back into the pot along with any accumulated juices, and give it another good stir. Cover the pot and place it in the oven for about 2 hours. When the beef falls apart, it's ready. Remove from the oven and let it cool.
Increase oven heat to 400F.
Place the cooled stew in a baking dish. Cut strips of the puff pastry and place them around the edges of the dish. (Moisten the underside of the strip to make sure it sticks to the dish) Now cover the entire pie with a sheet of pastry. Press it down on the edges to seal. Trim the excess and crimp to make a decorative edge. Brush the top with a bit of beaten egg mixed with a few drops of water or milk. Make a few slits in the top to allow steam to vent. Place in oven for about 30 minutes or until golden and bubbly. Let it sit for 5-10 minutes before serving.

Tips:
Instead of beef broth, you can use 2 cups of water and 2 beef bouillon cubes. Just reduce the amount of salt that you add. Actually, you could probably omit it altogether since there is quite a bit of sodium in the bouillon.
You can make the stew in advance then assemble the pie and bake it when you're ready to serve.
Traditional Steak Pie is usually just beef with onions, but I added celery and mushrooms because I like them! Add anything you like! If you're not a fan of turnips, feel free to serve it with just regular mashed potatoes.

Oh..one other thing.
This is NOT my picture. I borrowed it from a blog called Kittens in the Kitchen. I figured maybe they wouldn't mind if I were to borrow their picture just until I can take a few pictures of my own. As soon as my pie is finished, I'll swap out their picture for my own. I just wanted to hurry up and get the recipe posted in case anyone wanted to make it for New Year's Eve!


Scottish Steak Pie

This simple, old fashioned Scottish Steak Pie with a golden puff pasty lid is so easy to make! It’s a real Winter warmer and pure comfort food. Serve with mashed/new potatoes and seasonal veg for a hearty, warming meal!

I hope you had a lovely Christmas! We had a lovely quiet, relaxing time – which was exactly what was needed after the crazy December rush!

I just feel the past week has gone by incredibly quickly. Can you believe it’s New Year’s Eve tomorrow?

Here in Scotland it’s traditional to have a big steak pie on New Year’s Day.

Like many others, I’ve often bought a steak pie from my local butchers, but over the last couple of years I’ve made my own.

I keep things very simple – my steak pie is admittedly a rich and tender slow cooked beef stew with a golden, crispy puff pasty lid on top. If you order a steak pie in pubs across the UK, this is pretty much what you will get. It’s not fine dining, but it’s so damn good!

This easy recipe is exactly how my husband loves it, so I wouldn’t change a thing (I would never get away with it anyway even if I wanted to!)


SCOTTISH NEW YEARS DAY STEAK PIE

The steak pie became the national New Year’s dinner dish in Scotland because New Year’s Day was not traditionally taken as a holiday, (Western society has only been celebrating New Year for the past 400 years.) Families were too busy to cook and bought big steak pies from their local butcher instead. It was in 1871 that Scotland declared January 1st as a national holiday and then wasn’t until 1971 that Scotland got January 2 as another bank holiday.

Butcher-bought steak pie remains popular today, I suspect partly because most Scots are too hung-over to think about cooking on New Year’s Day. Hogmanay & New Years Day is about more than seeing in the bells with a dram of whisky and the best New Year street party in the world, the traditional celebrations continue well into the next day. In fact, it’s probably partly due to the over indulgence of alcohol that the ritual Ne’erday dinner continues to be such a vital part of New Year for so many Scots. The Traditional Steak Pie is round or oval in shape, which symbolises the end of one year with the seamless beginning of the next.

I do like to make my own steak pie and this recipe dates back to my Grannies and Aunties recipes. They key to a good steak pie is the meat, good quality Scottish Beef is key and it’s important to slow cook until it falls apart. I always make the night before too, this allows the gravy/juices to soak into the meat for an amazing flavour.


SCOTTISH NEW YEARS DAY STEAK PIE

The steak pie became the national New Year’s dinner dish in Scotland because New Year’s Day was not traditionally taken as a holiday, (Western society has only been celebrating New Year for the past 400 years.) Families were too busy to cook and bought big steak pies from their local butcher instead. It was in 1871 that Scotland declared January 1st as a national holiday and then wasn’t until 1971 that Scotland got January 2 as another bank holiday.

Butcher-bought steak pie remains popular today, I suspect partly because most Scots are too hung-over to think about cooking on New Year’s Day. Hogmanay & New Years Day is about more than seeing in the bells with a dram of whisky and the best New Year street party in the world, the traditional celebrations continue well into the next day. In fact, it’s probably partly due to the over indulgence of alcohol that the ritual Ne’erday dinner continues to be such a vital part of New Year for so many Scots. The Traditional Steak Pie is round or oval in shape, which symbolises the end of one year with the seamless beginning of the next.

I do like to make my own steak pie and this recipe dates back to my Grannies and Aunties recipes. They key to a good steak pie is the meat, good quality Scottish Beef is key and it’s important to slow cook until it falls apart. I always make the night before too, this allows the gravy/juices to soak into the meat for an amazing flavour.


Hogmanay Steak Pie

We eat this steak pie every Hogmanay night and New Year’s Day. The meat is so tender it just falls apart and the gravy is beautifully rich, the trick is in the slow cooking. We always need to plan to make enough for seconds when we have guests round for dinner! If you don’t have the time to cook it for so long and leave overnight you can easily make the recipe in one go in an hour and a half

  • 6 rump steaks
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 onion
  • 2 glasses red wine
  • 1 litre beef stock
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 500g puff pastry
  1. Heat oven to 120 C / Gas 1/2 and warm a pie dish.
  2. Cut rump steaks into cubes and season with salt and pepper.
  3. Heat olive oil in pan to high and quickly brown the steak cubes in batches, placing in pie dish once browned.
  4. Chop onion into pieces and mix with steak in the pie dish.
  5. Add the wine to the pot you browned the steak in and reduce by half, scraping all the steak bits and juices from the bottom of the pot. Add beef stock to the wine, mix and heat through
  6. Add the stock and wine to the beef in the pie dish, cover tightly with foil and place in the oven for 2 hours, checking and stirring occasionally.
  7. Allow to cool, then refrigerate overnight to let the meat soak in the juices from the gravy.
  8. The next morning heat oven to 200 C / Gas 6. Remove foil from pie dish and place in oven for 30 minutes. Add more stock if gravy is too thick or cornflour mixed first with cold water if it’s not thick enough for you.
  9. Roll out puff pastry and cover pie dish, brush with egg yolk.
  10. Return to oven and cook for a further 20 minutes or until pastry is as brown as you like it.

To serve

Serve with green beans or soaked marrowfat peas and mashed potatoes.

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Chef Michael Kilkie's top tips for a home-made steak pie for some New Year cheer

Nothing says tradition like the iconic dish that brings friends and family around the table every year.

This festive season is different, but that doesn’t mean we can’t still savour the thought of a delicious steak pie cooking away in the oven, and tuck into a taste of comfort. Don’t be afraid to make your own, says renowned chef Michael Kilkie, and you can get everything you need in your local Co-op.

It’s a myth that this is a complex dish best left to expert chefs like Michael.

“Nonsense, anyone can make a steak pie,” he says.

But he has some useful tips: “Even the most talented and exceptional chef will tell you to buy good quality puff pastry, don’t bother trying to make your own. Secondly, make sure you have the best ingredients.

“You only get out what you put in so use the best quality, which you’ll find in your local Co-op. If you start with a good product, then give it a bit of love and care when you are preparing and cooking it, you’ll end up with something special.”

You can make the filling a few days in advance, then cool and keep it in the fridge until you’re ready to wow your family with a rich and flavourful lunch or dinner.

Cut your puff pastry to size, roll it over the top of your pie dish and glaze it with egg wash and milk before you pop it in the oven and wait for the delicious aroma to make your mouth water.

“I’m quite traditional so I always go for mashed potatoes to soak up the sauce,” adds Michael.

Whether you have a steak pie before a big night, at the Bells, or the next day, this crowd-pleasing dish never fails to bring cheer to the New Year.

How to make a classic Steak Pie

INGREDIENTS

2 x 400g packs Co-op diced Scotch casserole steak

1 large onion, finely chopped

150ml beef stock, made with 1 stock cube

4 thyme or rosemary sprigs, or 2 tsp dried

6 rashers Co-op smoked streaky bacon, finely chopped

2 x 250g packs Co-op closed cup mushrooms, quartered

320g sheet ready rolled puff pastry

Melt 15g of the butter in a large ovenproof casserole dish and brown the beef all over in batches, about 10 mins, then remove with a slotted spoon.

Cook the onion and carrot in the same pan for 8-10 mins, until golden.

Return the beef and any resting juices to the pan, then sprinkle over the flour, season and stir well to coat. Pour in the beef stock and ale, then add the thyme or rosemary. Stir well, bring to the boil and simmer gently for around 10 mins. Preheat the oven to 170°C/fan 150°C/Gas 3.

Melt the remaining butter in a large frying pan and cook the bacon until crisp. Remove with a slotted spoon, then cook the mushrooms for 5-6 mins on a high heat, until golden.

Stir both into the beef mixture, then cook, covered, in the oven for 1½ to 2 hours, until the meat is very tender.

Allow to cool slightly, discard the herb stalks (if using) and transfer to a 28cm diameter pie dish. Increase the oven temperature to 190°C/fan 170°C/Gas 5.

Drape the pastry over the top, and trim the excess (use to decorate the pie). Beat the egg, then brush all over the pastry.

Make a small hole in the centre of the pie, for an air vent, and bake for 40-45 mins, until the pastry is golden.


Bells change the recipe of their famous steak pies for Christmas and Hogmanay

It just isn’t the festive season in Glasgow without a steak pie in the mix - so news that Bells Food Group has launched a new range of them might interest foodies stocking up for Christmas.

The Shotts-based company is introducing a premium Aberdeen Angus steak pie and a Hogmanay special too, as well as larger family-sized packs.

Both are prepared using a new method, braising select cuts of beef slowly and finishing with fancier versions of trusty puff pastry top, as the Aberdeen Angus crust is infused with parmesan and black pepper.

Read More
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The pies are now available in 1.1kg and 1.7kg packs - ideal if you have plenty of people coming round to celebrate.

Gordon Smith, director of sales and marketing at Bells Food Group, said: “The Bell family has been producing steak pies for three generations and we work hard to constantly improve our traditional recipes and cooking processes at the factory in Shotts.

“Our new steak pies are perfect for sharing with family at Christmas and Hogmanay. Steak pies remain at the heart of the Scottish dinner table, and Bells is a brand loved throughout Scotland”.

If you’re a steak pie lover - or just a fan of fun facts - then we have a few for you.

Read More
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Apparently Bells expect to sell enough steak pies this December to reach four times the height of Ben Nevis - and that’s a lot of pies.

If you were to stack them up then they’d be the height of around 10,000 six ft Christmas trees.

High demand means Bells takes on 20 additional staff for the festive season - and all their hard work will be stocked in supermarkets across Scotland.


Venison Steak Pie from Stagison

So, first thing’s first. We sell a mean steak and gravy pie at our butcher shop in Ceres, Fife. Delicious meat, tasty gravy and crunchy pastry makes it a mouthwatering meal. If you want one for New Year’s Day, it’s best to contact us in advance to check availability. Call us on 01334 828 229, and follow Ceres Butchers on Facebook for other types of venison meat for sale.

But perhaps you are up for a challenge and want to make your own venison Hogmanay steak pie? The sort of pie that gives you bragging rights for the whole year. The sort of pie that means you don’t have to do the washing up for a week. And definitely the sort of pie that has the family scraping the bottom of the tin for every last morsel.


Like all Scottish celebrations, Hogmanay festivities are accompanied by plenty of whisky, or uisge beatha (water of life). After all, what’s a party without a wee dram? The perfect tipple to contemplate the past year and embrace the new, purists will argue it’s best appreciated mixed with a single droplet of water – no more, no less.

Simple yet ever-popular, cranachan is one of the most traditional Scottish desserts, making it perfect for ringing in the New Year. This delight is formed through a perfect union of whipped cream, toasted oatmeal soaked overnight, honey, raspberries and, of course, the mandatory dose of whisky. Although typically served in a tall dessert glass, those with an affinity for tradition will bring all the ingredients out for guests to assemble their own as they please.